A chipboard Stationery Box.

Joe left to wander the highways a week ago today.  During his absence I have been working on a project that I had done a long time ago.  Check out Splitcoast Stampers to view the tutorial by Jackie Topa who has a fabulous project for a “Stationery Box” constructed entirely of heavy weight card stock.

After I made the original one way back in about 2009 or 2010 I sent it off to one of my daughters as a gift.  I have a photo of it somewhere but can’t remember where it is.

Since I have been playing with chipboard lately I thought I would give this stationery box a try.  I’m really trying to improve my skills in construction.  This box measures 6 inches wide by 5 inches tall and 2 inches deep.  The lid is roughly 6-1/4 x 1-1/2 x 2.

Stationery box

Stationery box

I noticed on Pinterest there is a color trend happening in 2014.  One of the colors is Green.  Note to self….watch more YouTube videos on floral placement :/  I’ve also decided to break into my stash of stuff I don’t use often.  The paper flowers I’ve had for a long time, with the exception of the little bitty yellow paper roses.  They are the newest addition to my stash.

I broke into my stash of chipboard pieces I’ve had for years and years and covered them with paper.  I chose the pieces because of their shapes and not what was originally on the pieces.  The lid of the box holds the altered chipboard embellishments that have been hanging around all this long time.  I covered one of the chipboard pieces with a bit of an old map book/atlas we used in our truck driving job before we started using the GPS.  I figured the map part would be appropriate since the cards I would be putting in this box would be mailed all over this country…..eventually.

Altered chipboard pieces

Altered chipboard pieces

The lid comes off the top of the box.  It holds the box closed.  I was tempted to make a flap style lid but decided against that since I have had enough trouble with flaps and the closures of them :/

Removable lid

Removable lid

Once the lid is removed the front of the box falls down for easy access to the contents.  Yes….I had to fuss around with a flap :/  However, I had more success with this flap than I have most of the others.

Front of box is a flap

Front of box is a flap

There are three compartments in this Stationery box, as you can see.  The large section in the back will hold A2 greeting cards.  The 4-1/4 by 5-1/2 cards that are frequently made by nearly every card maker.  The accompanying envelopes will also fit in this slot.  The two front areas are to hold tags (on the left) and 3″ x 3″ note cards (on the right).

This Stationery box is meant to have matching greeting cards, tags, and note cards.  I have not got that far in the process.  The next photo is to show you what it would look like when the compartments are used as intended.

Slots for cards and tags

Slots for cards and tags

If anyone would be interested in learning how to make this Stationery Box out of chipboard I would be happy to make a video of the process.  It might take a few videos to accomplish it.  I have vowed that I will NEVER make another video that is an  hour long.  I, for one, can’t sit still and watch a video that is an hour long.  I have the attention span of a gnat.

You might want to fiddle with Jackie Topa’s fabulous creation (click on the link at the top of this post) before you consent to making this out of chipboard.  Trust me….it will make understanding the process easier if you follow her instructions first.

What have you done lately to “Show someone how special they are”?

Leslie

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The definition of Insanity is…..

DOING THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER EXPECTING DIFFERENT RESULTS!

After having been successful in making the file folder box I figured it would be a snap to reduce the size to make a box to hold greeting cards and a smaller box to hold index cards for the way too many Internet sites and passwords I have and can’t seem to remember.

Two attempts were made to create a box that measures 6-3/8 inches wide by 4-3/4 inches tall and 1-1/2 inches deep, with a flap.

Two attempts to make the same box

Two attempts to make the same box

I gave up on the greeting card boxes because they were just way too wonky and I didn’t like the way they were coming together.

The next box I began was for an even smaller version of these two boxes.  Yep.  If you can’t figure out how to make something one size it is always worth while to go SMALLER :/

What the heck was I thinking?!

Smaller box

Smaller box

These boxes made from cardboard are quite thick.  They are very sturdy and can be used for heavy objects.  The only problem is they are too thick, clumsy, and labor intensive.  Mass producing these boxes would take quite a lot of time.

To decrease the bulk of the boxes I decided to give chipboard a try.  One 8-1/2 x 11 inch piece of chipboard will ALMOST make the greeting card box.  I had to get into my scrap pile for the extra chipboard for the lid and the flap.

You can see the measurements I have made on the chipboard….just in case you wish to make one of the greeting card boxes.

 

Measurements on sheet of chipboard

Measurements on sheet of chipboard

Measurements on scrap of chipboard

Measurements on scrap of chipboard

This is the order you would lay the pieces on the paper you choose to cover with.

Layout of pieces

Layout of pieces

This layout is too long for  a 12 x 12 sheet of scrapbook paper.  I had to use a bit of a matching paper for the lid and the flap.  That was a bug a boo to figure out  how to attach.

 

Attaching the lid and flap

Attaching the lid and flap

NOTE TO SELF:  Next time choose a paper with one design element featuring smaller images.

 

Attaching the lid and flap extension

Attaching the lid and flap extension

This is how the pieces will be laid out on the paper you choose.

Laid out on paper

Laid out on paper

When this box is finished it will hold 10 greeting cards with envelopes.

Holds 10 cards with envelopes

Holds 10 cards with envelopes

Magnets - they will be the death of me

Magnets – they will be the death of me

The extension

The extension

After battling the greeting card box, and having a little more success….I’m still not totally thrilled with how it has come out.  Especially the flippin’ MAGNETS!  I decided to turn my focus to the smaller box for the Internet passwords.

This box will use a half sheet of 8-1/2 x 11 chipboard.  The measurements are shown below.  Please note the change to three of the measurements.  Don’t ask me where my head was during this process.  I don’t have a clue what I was thinking.

Measurements on chipboard

Measurements on chipboard

Lay the pieces out on the decorative paper of your choice in this layout.  When attaching the chipboard to the paper I moved it over to the right edge and in 3/4 of an inch.

 

Laid out on paper

Laid out on paper

When completed, this box has thinner edges than the cardboard, which I was happier with.  The box itself was more square and less wonky.

 

Cardboard and chipboard comparison

Cardboard and chipboard comparison

The index cards for the Internet site and password file are 2-1/2 inches by 3 inches.  I found these at my local office supply store.

Index cards

Index cards

I will not be doing a full fledged tutorial on the construction of these boxes UNTIL I get the blasted things figured out.  I don’t like the side flaps showing on the front of the box.  Might as well have a “Mickey Mouse” image on this box.

Box with index cards

Box with index cards

Yes, and you can totally forget about the addition of any MAGNETS to close the box with.  I think I will be going back to my old friend – Velcro.  Velcro loves me and I love it back.

Here is a sample of how to use the index cards for the passwords.

 

Index card ready for info

Index card ready for info

I think I’m going to find something mindless to do for the next few hours.  My brain hurts :/

Go, “Show someone how special they are”.

Leslie

Dealing with “Special Requests”.

Joe has requested another mileage book made for 2014.  He has requested a journal featuring maps of some kind and a pocket inside.

It is good to have family members be the “Guinea Pig” in your journey as a “Paper Artist”.  They get all the wonky creations as you develop your skills toward a professional level.  I haven’t reached that level just yet, but I’m getting closer.  My main problem is my “Perfectionism”.

I purchased a Heidi Swapp “No Limits” paper pad some months back.  I wanted Joe to look through and choose the papers he liked.

Looking at the options

Looking at the options

Explaining the creation process to Joe was a game of communication.   He told me what he wanted and liked, I told him what would work and what would not.  This process took about half an hour because I could not get him to understand the images he wanted on his book cover would have to be glued OVER a base.  He had chosen several map images that are not large enough for a complete cover.  To get him to understand what I was trying to convey I gave him one of the book covers, told  him there needed to be one inch margin all around the cover board.  I let him play with that for a while until he totally understood the concept I was trying to get across.

First choice

First choice

Second choice

Second choice

Once Joe understood the process he decided on some fairly plain paper as the background and chose the images he favored to be placed on the covers.   I also had Joe pick out paper for the inside covers, to hide the edges that wrap around from the front.

Favored choice for front

Favored choice for front

Favored choice for back

Favored choice for back

A second choice for the front

A second choice for the front

When you know what your capabilities are in the construction process, you can guide the person making the “Special Request”.  There are ways of implementing their choices and desires.  Focal images too large for the front, that is dealt with by wrapping the edges around to the inside and covering them with the inside cover paper.

Wrap the image edges

Wrap the image edges

Want to draw attention to a design feature on the base paper?  Use the images to frame the feature.

Include background images

Include background images

I chose to add Washi Tape to the inside cover edges.  The Washi was applied to keep the wrapped images from tearing and/or snagging through wear.

Decorative Washi Tape

Decorative Washi Tape

The back page has a pocket on two sides.  I cut a 12 x 12 sheet of paper to 9 inches wide by 9-7/8 inches long.  Score the paper in half lengthwise at 4-1/2 inches.  Score the bottom edge at 3 inches.  Fold the 3 inch score line up then fold the page in half to create the two pockets.  Joe can put his receipts in the pocket then deal with them at night as he does his paperwork.

 

Pocket page

Pocket page

He only wanted a single focal image on the back of the book.  This was accomplished as on the front.  Wrap the edges around the cover and hide them beneath the inside cover page.

Back cover

Back cover

Upon seeing the completed journal, Joe had to emphasis this item was his.  He said “MINE”.

Joe likes his new journal

Joe likes his new journal

When his children were little, they used to argue and fuss over toys.  One child would proclaim the toy was “MINE”, sending the others into fits of anguish.  Joe solved this “MINE” problem by making the declarative child carry the toy under their arm all day long.  That put a stop to the scream fest of toy ownership.

I reminded Joe of what happens when a person says something is “MINE”.  He obliged.  I think I was mere seconds from getting a tongue stuck out at me.

Humoring me

Humoring me

When dealing with Special Requests by family or others, be confident in your skills as a Paper Artist.  You can create an item to their needs while you focus on manipulating the paper(s) to achieve the desired results.  Keep in mind there are some requests that can not be fulfilled.  Either from the images on the paper or from your skill level.  Family members are the best asset you have in honing your skills.  Take advantage of them and don’t pass up the options of Special Requests from them.  You will both learn something, which is always a good thing.

Go “Show someone how special they are”.

Leslie

 

 

Covering the File Folder box.

Finished file box

Finished file box

The first thing you will do to cover your brand spanking new file box is to figure out what paper you want to use on the inside and the outside of the box.  Second thing is to decide what color of acrylic paint you want to use on the edges of the box – inside and out.

Painting all of the structure strip pieces, and a little past the strips is all you will be glopping the paint on.

Paint all the edges of the box

Paint all the edges of the box

Depending on the color of your paint, you may need to use more than one coat.  I had to put three coats of the white paint on this box.  Let it dry between coats before you begin attaching the papers.

The MEASUREMENTS for the papers are as follows:

The FRONT and BACK pieces will measure 11-1/2 inches by 9-1/2 inches.

The LEFT and RIGHT sides will measure 9-1/2 inches by 2-1/2 inches.

The BOTTOM will measure 11-1/2 inches by 2-1/2 inches.

Inside measurements

Inside measurements

The INSIDE LID and FLAP measurements are as follows:

Inside LID measures 11-1/2 inches by 2-1/2 inches.

Inside FLAP measures 11-1/2 inches by 1-1/2 inches.

Inside lid and flap measurements

Inside lid and flap measurements

The OUTSIDE LID and FLAP measurements are as follows:

OUTSIDE LID measures 11-3/4 inches by 2-3/4 inches.

OUTSIDE FLAP measures 11-3/4 inches by 1-3/4 inches.

Outside Lid and Flap

Outside Lid and Flap

The OUTSIDE FRONT measurements are as follows:

Outside Front measures 11-3/4 inches by 9-3/4 inches.  If you put the crescent shaped notch in the front, trace the notch on BOTH THE INSIDE AND OUTSIDE PAPERS SEPARATELY then cut away an additional 1/4 inch or less.

Cut away for the notch

Cut away for the notch

Front measurements

Front measurements

The BACK measurements will be the same, as follows:

11-3/4 inches by 9-3/4 inches.

Back measurements

Back measurements

The LEFT and RIGHT PANELS will  measure the same and they are as follows:

9-3/4 inches by 2-3/4 inches

Left and right panels

Left and right panels

The BOTTOM PANEL will measure as follows:

11-3/4 inches by 2-3/4 inches

 

I had an EPIC FAIL!  I have some magnets that I purchased to use as closures.

 

Magnets for the closures

Magnets for the closures

I’ve never used magnets before so I didn’t know how I was going to make this happen.  I carried on with it.  Placed the magnets where I wanted them, cut holes, installed the magnets, covered them with paper to secure them….and they didn’t work.

 

Installed magnets

Installed magnets

Now there are EIGHT (8) yellow dots on the flap which tell the tail of my EPIC FAIL.

 

Yellow dots

Yellow dots

The way I fixed it was to just attach a length of ribbon.

Ribbon instead

Ribbon instead

I used my trusty ruler to attach the letter stickers to the outside of the box.  The stickers are from the Paper Studio baby papers used to cover the file folders.

Attach the sticker letters

Attach the sticker letters

The rest of the stickers, the file folder tab labels, and the folders are inside the box I made.

Stickers, tags, and files

Stickers, tags, and files

My baby is so beautiful.

My baby

My baby

My husband is home now and we are running errands like crazy people.  There will be a small gap in my creative posts.  I know, I hear all the loud sighs of relief from you guys.  I think you may deserve a break from me for a day or two.  BUT NOT FOR LONG!

Are you ready to go and “Show someone how special they are”?

Leslie

Making a File Box – Part 3

Today, we are going to be putting the box together.  Seriously, this is simple to do.  The one thing I can tell you that is an absolute MUST is to have smooth cuts on your cardboard.  The pieces fit better when there are no wavy cuts or jagged edges bunging up the works.

File folder box

File folder box

Transform that box, in the photo above, into this box by following the steps below for the construction.

Finished file box

Finished file box

 

First thing to do is prep your work surface.  Whether you use liquid glue or a dry adhesive, such as Scor-Tape, you will need to have a containment area to keep all the gooey stuff from getting all over your table.  Personally, I like to use Freezer Paper.

Freezer paper

Freezer paper

Freezer paper has a slick side and a paper side.  The slick side will be UP, facing you.  Spread it out on your work surface and tape it down with some painters tape.

Use painters tape to hold the paper down

Use painters tape to hold the paper down

Get your supply of “structure strips” ready.  The adhesive you use is a personal choice.  Liquid adhesive or dry adhesive.  Doesn’t matter, they both accomplish the same objective…getting the strips to attach to the cardboard.  I prefer liquid glue.  Squirt some on, spread it around, then attach to the cardboard.  I’m all for saving time and being efficient.

Having to pull out a length of the dry adhesive, make sure it gets attached in the correct place, fussing with it and using a bone folder to make sure of good adhesion to the strip, then dealing with the paper covers.  Pulling the paper off the glue strip, containing the growing piles, chasing them on the floor because I missed the trash bag.  Then having no “Forgiveness” in the process.  When the dry adhesive gets attached it is there forever.  Liquid glue I can move the piece about to get it positioned right.

Round up your supplies

Round up your supplies

Fold one of the strips at the score line you had made and apply your adhesive….or apply your dry adhesive then fold on the score mark.  Smear out the liquid glue with a sponge brush then attach the strip to the bottom edge of the FILE BOX BACK piece.  That will be one of the 12 inch by 10 inch pieces.  Make sure you don’t put the folded area at the edge of your box piece.  Leave a small gap with the fold line showing.

Apply

Apply glue

It is vital that you get the adhesive out to the very edges of the strip.  Leaving a long worm of glue and calling it good is NOT good

Smear

Smear

Attach

Attach

Apply pressure and rub on the cardboard to fully engage the glued strip to the cardboard.  Turn the cardboard over and apply pressure along the length of the glued strip to ensure full adhesion.

Press firmly, front and back, for proper adhesion

Press firmly, front and back, for proper adhesion

If you need to add a bit of strip to a shorter length it is easy as cutting a piece to the length needed then glue it on, or if there is excess strip hanging off one side then snip it away.

Locate your BOTTOM piece.  This will be one of the 3 inch by 12 inch pieces.  Run glue the length of the exposed strip (or peel off the backing from the dry adhesive).  Smear the glue to the edges.  Butt the cardboard pieces together and raise the strip to be attached to the bottom piece.  Firmly rub the glued strip to get it adhered well.

Locate the box bottom piece

Locate the box bottom piece

Apply glue

Apply glue

Smear glue

Smear glue

Butt the two pieces together

Butt the two pieces together

Apply pressure to the strip for good adhesion

Apply pressure to the strip for good adhesion

It will look like this when properly glued together.

Two pieces attached

Two pieces attached

Get another structure strip and apply adhesive to one half of the strip.  If using liquid glue, smear the glue to the edges.  Attach the glued side of the strip to the side of your back piece.  We will be building the side in this step.

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Attach strip to one side of the box

Attach strip to one side of the box

Locate your next piece of cardboard.  One that measures 3 inches by 10 inches.  Apply glue to the strip and butt the side piece to the back piece.

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Attach the side piece

Attach the side piece

Cut away any excess strip that overhangs.  Measure and cut a piece of structure strip that will go on the bottom and side corner.  Apply adhesive, attach the strip to the corner of the side and bottom.

Cut a piece of strip to fit on the corner

Cut a piece of strip to fit on the corner

Apply adhesive to the entire strip

Apply adhesive to the entire strip

Press firmly at this joint to assure good adhesion.  Snip away any overhang of the strip.

Attach to the corner and press firmly

Attach to the corner and press firmly

Next you will further reinforce the seams of this box by doing the following.  Get a length of structure strip and apply adhesive to the entire strip.  Make sure the creased fold is facing you.  The “Mountain” fold will be up.  Work the folded strip into the joint of the back and side pieces of the box.  Press firmly all along the strip to ensure proper adhesion.  Set the box on its side and press the strip fully.

Apply adhesive fully to the strip

Apply adhesive fully to the strip

Press the strip firmly into the joint

Press the strip firmly into the joint

Place the box on its side and apply pressure to the strip

Place the box on its side an apply pressure to the strip

You will also need to reinforce the corner where the bottom and sides meet.  Do the same as above.  Apply glue to the strip, MOUNTAIN side, press the strip into the joint and apply pressure to adhere the strip firmly.

Measure a corner piece and adhere

Measure a corner piece and adhere

Following the steps above, get your other 3 inch by 10 inch piece and adhere it to the other side of the back and bottom piece.

Attach the other side piece

Attach the other side piece

Next, we will work on the FRONT of the box.  Locate your last 10 inch by 12 inch piece.  I am going to cut a curve at the top of this piece.

Locate the other 10 inch by 12 inch piece

Locate the other 10 inch by 12 inch piece

Find the center along the 12 inch width.  I am using a thing I don’t know what it is EXCEPT it has  a curve.  I have lined up the center mark of the curve tool with the center mark on the cardboard and traced around the tool.

Find the center along the 12 inch piece

Find the center along the 12 inch length

With a craft mat under my cardboard piece, I have used a craft tool to cut on the pencil line.

Use a craft knife to cut on the pencil line

Use a craft knife to cut on the pencil line

Cut the curve away

Cut the curve away

The front of the box will look like this.

Front of box

Front of box

Back to the structure strip business to attach the front to the box.  Apply adhesive to both sides of the strip.  Making sure the adhesive goes all the way out to the edges.

Apply adhesive to the strip

Apply adhesive to the strip

Attach the strip to the box front and side corner

Attach the strip to the box front and side corner

Do the same to the other side of the box.  Make sure the edges butt up against each other as you apply the strip.

Attach the other side and front

Attach the other side and front

Look at this.  So far this is going along smoothly and is very easy to create the box.  Keep going….you are over half way finished.

Looking like a box

Looking like a box

The last part of the outside is to adhere a strip to the box bottom and front to close this up.

Last outside piece to attach

Last outside piece to attach

By now, you should have a good handle on how to use the structure strips.  The last thing to do is reinforce the inside of the box.  MOUNTAIN folds on this part.  Get the folded ridge pushed into the joints all over the inside of the box.

Reinforce the inside joints

Reinforce the inside joints

You can stop here if you don’t want to have a lid on your box.  The rest of this is how to put a lid and flap on, covering the edges, and making a cover for the curved edge.

If moving on to the lid.  Locate your last 3 inch by 12 inch piece.  Place it on top of the box opening.  If you were careful in your placement of the structure strips your box will be even and flush.  If you have a wonky box you will need to make adjustments to it now.  That will involve slitting the structure strips where the problem lies, moving the box to square, then reapplying structure strips.

Using the structure strips, attach the box lid to the BACK of the box.  Then attach the FLAP to the TOP FRONT OF THE BOX.  Doing this will make the next steps easier to handle.  You will be making a “Ditch” for the proper working of the lid and flap.

Check the fit of the lid

Check the fit of the lid

Working on the INSIDE of the lid piece.  You will need to take your structure strip to the score board and make another score 1/8 inch to the left of the center score.  You will have a “U” shape for this strip.  This is necessary.

Score 1/8 inch to left of center

Score 1/8 inch to left of center

Apply adhesive to the "U" shape

Apply adhesive to the “U” shape

Holding the lid in place, press the “U” into the joint of the lid and the top of the box.  You will need this extra bit of spacing to make the lid work properly.

Press the "U" into the joint of the lid and the top

Press the “U” into the joint of the lid and the top

Locate your final piece, the 2 inch by 12 inch piece.  Get another structure strip and score 1/8 inch to the left of center and apply the glued strip to the joint of the flap and the lid.  Make sure to apply pressure to strip on both of these pieces.

Locate the 2 inch by 12 inch piece

Locate the 2 inch by 12 inch piece

Seat the "U" into the joint of the top and flap

Seat the “U” into the joint of the top and flap

Work the flap  up and down to make sure it is secure

Work the flap up and down to make sure it is secure

Your lid and flap should be working well.  The lid will not close fully at this point.  When you cover the box, or paint it, the lid and flap will be secured with a magnet or Velcro.

Apply structure strips to the outside joints

Apply structure strips to the outside joints

Now all that is left is to cover up the raw edges of the box and lid.  Gather your structure strips and take them to the score board.  Score 1/8 inch to the left of center on a whole bunch of them.  Measure and cut a piece of strip to fit one of the side edges.  Apply adhesive and adhere the strip to the box raw edge.

Score the structure strips 1/8 inch to the left of center

Score the structure strips 1/8 inch to the left of center

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Attach to raw edge

Attach to raw edge

Continue covering your raw edges of the flap and the other side of the box.  We will deal with the curve in a moment.

Cover all the raw edges

Cover all the raw edges

Now for the curve.  Start with a long length of structure strip, crease it fully on the fold lines.  Place the strip over the front raw edge.  Note where the curve of the front begins.  Make a snip in the strip.  End the snip CLOSE TO the fold line.  NOT INTO THE FOLD.

Make snips along the length of the strip as you follow the curve.

Snip TO the crease where the curve begins

Snip TO the crease where the curve begins

Make corresponding snips on the back side of the strip.  Remember to NOT snip into the crease mark.

Make corresponding snips to the back of the strip

Make corresponding snips to the back of the strip

Test fit the snipped strip.  Add any additional snips where necessary.

Test fit the snipped strip

Test fit the snipped strip

Make more snips if necessary

Make more snips if necessary

When satisfied then this is done

When satisfied then this is done

Liberally apply adhesive to the snipped strip then attach to the box front raw edge.

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Install strip

Install strip

Apply the last bit of strip to finish off the raw edges.  Let this box set for about 24 hours for the adhesive to cure.  Even the dry adhesive needs a cure time.  You can think about what you want to do about covering the box while the adhesive cures.

I seriously  hope this tutorial has been clear and concise in my instruction and the accompanying photos.  I also hope that I have given you the confidence to give box building a try.

Are you ready to go and “Show someone how special they are”?

Leslie

How to make a file folder box – The Measurements.

This post is about the measurements and cutting the cardboard to make this file folder box.

File folder box

File folder box

You might want to take a moment and jot these measurements down.  The box parts are listed next to the dimensions.

The dimensions

The dimensions

Hefting that 50 pound…I think it gets heavier each time I lift it…..industrial paper cutter to the table.  I prepared to be underwhelmed by the cuts.  HOWEVER, this thing cuts right through cardboard as if it were a single sheet of paper.  It spits the rest of the cardboard out the back after the cut and I have to go chase after it.

Cuts like a dream

Cuts like a dream

Spits, too

Spits, too

Having the extension down didn’t help one single bit.  The cut cardboard shot right off anyway.

Using the extension

Using the extension

Here are the cuts.  Two (2) 10 inch by 12 inch.  Front and back panels.

Front and back

Front and back

Two (2) 3 inch by 12 inch.  These are the box bottom and the box top.

Top and bottom

Top and bottom

Two (2) 3 inch by 10 inch pieces for the two sides.

Two side pieces

Two side pieces

And, lastly, the flap piece.  One (1) 2 inch by 12 inch piece.

One flap piece

One flap piece

This is the scrap left over from the cutting.  Oh, and a little strip from a mis-measured piece.

Scrap cardboard

Scrap cardboard

Ooooops, measured wrong.

Oooops, measured wrong.

The last bit of cutting and prep work before building the box is about to happen.  Structure strips need to be made.  Get out your craft card stock.  I used four (4) sheets of the card stock.  Cutting the sheets into 1 inch strips.

 

Cut card stock into 1 inch strips

Cut card stock into 1 inch strips

Next, score the strips at 1/2 inch using a score board.

Structure strips will be scored

Structure strips will be scored

At 1/2 inch

At 1/2 inch

When you have finished the last strip, go take a break or do something else for a while.  Your poor finger will thank you.

 

"Groovy" finger

“Groovy” finger

Tomorrow’s post will be all about assembling the box.  Hope your finger is better by then.  It won’t have a permanent crease.  I promise.

Leslie

 

How to make a file folder box – The beginning

Are you ready for another long ride?  No, no, no.  It is not about cleaning my craft room.  I promise!  This is about making a file folder box.  Like this one I made on Sunday.

File folder box

File folder box

As you know, my posts are ALWAYS photo heavy.  This one has to be broken up into bite sized chunks.  Although it took me only about four hours to make this box from scratch, there is a ton of stuff involved in making this thing.  The file folders, actually, fit in this box and there is plenty of room for growth.

File folders in the box

File folders in the box

You will need some cardboard that will be 12 inches by 36 inches.  A giant box will work for this.  As you know, I have sheets of cardboard for projects like this.  I get mine from my local Budget Box and Bag store.

Sheets of cardboard

Sheets of cardboard

These sheets of cardboard are what get placed on top of forklift pallets to keep product from falling through the slats.  These sheets are also placed on top of a full forklift pallet as a buffer when another pallet is stacked on top.

I had to take one  sheet out to my kitchen and put it on the floor.  I then sneaked into my  husband’s office – while he is not home – and “borrowed” a straight edge.  Shhhhh.  Don’t tell him.

 

On the kitchen floor

On the kitchen floor

Using my trusty ruler, I made tick marks the width of the cardboard at 12 inches.  If my math is correct I will only need to cut one (1) of these 12 x 36 pieces.

Using the straight edge I lined it up on my tick marks and used my pencil to connect the dots.

Make tick marks across at 12 inches

Make tick marks across at 12 inches

Use a straight edge to connect the dots

Use a straight edge to connect the dots

 

Perfect line

Perfect line

Next stash of my husband’s to raid is his wood pile.  I need a board that will span the width of the cardboard and be wide enough so I can cut through it.  I have placed the board under the cardboard and under the line to be cut.

Raid the wood pile

Raid the wood pile

Wood placed under the cardboard

Wood placed under the cardboard

With the cardboard sandwiched between the piece of wood and the straightedge, lined up on the pencil line, it was time to make the first cut.  Make sure your craft knife has a fresh blade in it.  A dull blade will cause the cardboard to tear and have jagged lines.  You need clean lines.

Line the straight edge up on the pencil line

Line the straight edge up on the pencil line

Make sure you have a fresh blade

Make sure you have a fresh blade

Using the straight edge as a guide, cut through the first layer of cardboard with your craft knife.  Using the straight edge for this first bit of business will keep a straight line instead of a drunken wiggly line….like I usually make.

Make your first cut through the cardboard

Make your first cut through the cardboard

Move the straight edge out of the way.  Place your craft knife at the top of the cut you  just made and carefully cut through the bottom layer of cardboard.  Make double sure before you start this that your cardboard is on the wood.  Don’t need to cut through your flooring :/

Cut through the bottom layer of the cardboard

Cut through the bottom layer of the cardboard

Now, with much creaking, groaning, popping, and snapping get yourself up off the floor.  Take a moment to make the dizzy go away or let the blood get back down from your face before you run around your house with a sharp knife.

I put everything back where I found it.  Husband will never know I had entered his domain and tampered with his goods.  That is if he doesn’t read my blog :/  Then I’ll have some explaining to do.  I can always bat my eyes at him.  That usually works well 😀

Tomorrow.  The big honkin industrial paper cutter gets off the floor and onto the table.  I will have all the measurements tomorrow for the cuts that will be made to create this file folder box.   See…I was still a bit dizzy when I took this photo.

Industrial paper cutter

Industrial paper cutter

Don’t worry .  You don’t need an industrial paper cutter for this job.  A sharp craft knife, self healing mat, and a straight edge is what you will need.  I have the monster machine and might as well use it.

I guess I ought to ask….Are you guys even interested in finding out how to create a file folder box?

What have you been doing to “Show someone how special they are”?

Leslie

 

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