OBC – Lace and the Dreaded Hot Glue Gun

ONE BOOB CHRONICLE – Lace and the Dreaded Hot Glue Gun

I think for the 1,000th time I’m going to once again say “I HATE THE HOT GLUE GUN”!

Blister burns from the hot glue gun

Blister burns from the hot glue gun

I spent yesterday assembling the wands as far as I could go with them.  I found a bolt of lace at my local Hobby Lobby in the Clearance Section.  Using my nemesis to attach the lace to the back side of the rosette was an all day affair.

Strings of hot glue webs everywhere, poking in a fresh glue stick for each rosette, and generally having my fingers of both hands sensitive to heat by the end of the day was rewarding to see the pile of wands completed.

Stage one of the wands

Stage one of the wands

I used up the entire bolt of lace with this project so far.  I have six remaining and will need to get more lace.

The bolt of lace I used

The bolt of lace I used

Time to get more lace

Time to get more lace

The back side of the wand needs some work.  I have to work some more with the hot glue gun to add some decorative lace to  hide the band which shows around the back cover.

Desperate need of something

Desperate need of something

I’m wading into unfamiliar territory here.  Using lace, and soon flowers, is definitely in my DIS-comfort zone.  Maybe by the time I get finished with these wands I will be a well seasoned craft person who can bravely tackle anything.

I thoroughly enjoyed your comments and advice yesterday on using intricate dies.  Thank you all for sharing your experience and wisdom.

Do you use the hot glue gun?  Do you have a “Go To” formula for hiding the lace edges?  What do you recommend for making this task a bit easier?  I look forward to your comments and advice.

Leslie

 

Advertisements

OBC – Trouble With Intricate Dies

ONE BOOB CHRONICLE – Trouble With Intricate Dies

Recently, I received a package in the mail from Katinah Walker.  In the massive box of wonderful things was a Sizzix die set.

Sizzix die set

Sizzix die set

I have used two of the dies for the “Wands” I am creating.  One is a scalloped circle and the other is a very intricate “doily” die.

Scallop circle die and intricate doily die

Scallop circle die and intricate doily die

I didn’t have much trouble with the scallop circle die.  I cut some DCWV paper to 4 inch squares and ran the die and paper through my Sizzix Big Shot.  It didn’t take long for me to make 26 of these.  The doily die….that is another story that I have video of my many trials in getting the right set up to work well.

For the doily pieces I cut two sheets of Colorbok white textured card stock into three inch square pieces.

Let’s just say that I nearly gave up after struggling to make five of the doily pieces.

Die cut scallop circles and doilies

Die cut scallop circles and doilies

During the time I have been absent, I have watched a lot of YouTube videos on die cutting intricate dies.  Some people use dryer sheets during the cutting to make the dies release, some people use waxed paper.  I’ve also seen videos that strongly urge the viewer to not use either method.

Since I did not own any intricate dies….before Ms. Katinah Walker blessed me with this set….I just only half paid attention to the video instructions.

I don’t own dryer sheets so I attempted to use a paper towel.  FAIL

I changed the position of the die on the cutting plates.  Face up and face down.  FAIL

The die did cut the doily, to be sure.  Releasing the die cut from the die is another story all together.  Then spending a lot of time poking out the holes with a piercing tool was not my idea of an enjoyable process.

Then I read the instructions on the Sizzix packet.

The instructions suggest using waxed paper on the intricate die and run it through the machine three times.

BAM!  Only a little bit of poking with the piercing tool to get the holes open.  That worked so well, I was able to complete all the doily pieces in a couple hours.

The intricate doily die

The intricate doily die

The conclusion of the die cutting day resulted in a three hour nap.  Good grief!

What are your stories or advice in using intricate dies?  I would really like to know so tell me in the comment section below.  I will be having a video up HOPEFULLY by Friday.

Leslie

OBC – Gifts from far and wide

ONE BOOB CHRONICLE – Gifts From Far and Wide

During this past year, while I have been going through the treatment for breast cancer, my YouTube community has blessed me with gifts of all kinds.  From Italy, Canada, the United Kingdom, and various places here in the United States.

I have been thinking of a way to thank each person who took the time to make things for me and send all kinds of crafting supplies.  I had watched videos on the making of “Pocket Letters” which are made from baseball card sheaths.  I just have not been able to think what I can put in each of the small pockets.

Recently, I received an astoundingly beautiful “Loaded Envelope” from a friend in New York.  Roberta Commeau.

Gifts from New York.  A "Loaded Envelope"

Gifts from New York. A “Loaded Envelope”

This is something that I can do, and I am excited to begin the process.  I need to make 26 of these.  Starting with the “wands”.

I spent the weekend making rosettes from glittered paper I have in my stash.

If you have not tried to make a rosette, and don’t know how to make one, I have some step by step instructions for you.  These rosettes can be any size you would like to make.  Mine are 2 inches by 12 inches.

This is a 12 x 12 sheet of card stock from an old DCWV paper pack.

A 12 x 12 card stock sheet from DCWV

A 12 x 12 card stock sheet from DCWV

Since I am making so many of these rosettes, I can get six from one sheet of paper.  I turned the paper over to expose the blank back side.  Using my Martha Stewart Score Board, score the paper every 1/4 inch.

Score the paper every 1/4 inch

Score the paper every 1/4 inch

Before you cut the paper into strips, MAKE SURE THE SCORE MARKS ARE HORIZONTAL.

Turn the paper so the score marks are horizontal

Turn the paper so the score marks are horizontal

I cut the paper into 2 inch strips.  Using a Martha Stewart Border Punch I then punched one edge of the strip.

Cut the paper into 2 inch strips

Cut the paper into 2 inch strips

Use a border punch for a decorative edge

Use a border punch for a decorative edge

The punched strip

The punched strip

Next step is to make the accordion folds along the strip of paper.

Make the mountain and valley folds on the strip of paper

Make the mountain and valley folds on the strip of paper

Accordion folded strip

Accordion folded strip

Attaching the ends of the strip is the next task.  As you look at the ends together you will notice the ends are matching.  You need to cut away one of the 1/4 inch pieces to make the overlap needed to join the two edges.

Matching edges, you need to cut one away

Matching edges, you need to cut one away

Remove one 1/4 inch strip

Remove one 1/4 inch strip

Now you can join the strip

Now you can join the strip

Add the adhesive of your choice to one strip, then place the other edge over the adhesive and press tightly.  Then set this aside to dry.

Add adhesive to one edge

Add adhesive to one edge

Join the edges and press firmly

Join the edges and press firmly

Set aside to dry

Set aside to dry

I have used a 1 inch circle punch to make pieces to hold the rosette together.  That will be some tricky business.

One inch hole punch

One inch hole punch

Make the fasteners

Make the fasteners

Now comes the tricky part.  These little guys are not always cooperative.  Turn the rosette piece over so the decorative edge is against the table.  Begin pushing inward on the rosette until it starts to lie down.

Keep working the rosette as you go along.  There will be places you will have to do some adjusting until it finally lies flat.

Turn the rosette over on the decorative punched edge

Turn the rosette over on the decorative punched edge

Start pressing inward on the folds

Start pressing inward on the folds

Pressing inward and down will cause the rosette to collapse

Pressing inward and down will cause the rosette to collapse

Sometimes a little adjustment is necessary

Sometimes a little adjustment is necessary

There is your rosette

There is your rosette.

Next challenge will be to turn your rosette over.  It will pop up but don’t worry.  You have already trained it the way it needs to be.  Add glue of your  choice to one of the 1 inch circles and attach to the center of your rosette.  Then put it under something heavy until it dries.

Turn the rosette over

Turn the rosette over

Add adhesive of your choice to a 1 inch circle

Add adhesive of your choice to a 1 inch circle

Press the punched circle into the center of the rosette

Press the punched circle into the center of the rosette

This  is how it will look

This is how it will look

Put the rosette under something to allow it to dry

Put the rosette under something to allow it to dry

This is my finished stash of rosettes ready to be made into “Wands”.  I need to make a trip to Hobby Lobby or Michaels for some paper straws.

As I make these I will show you the process.  For the remainder of creating these “wands” I will be using my dreaded hot glue gun.

Thank you, Roberta, for your inspiration.

Leslie