Going Old School to meet a need

Using a letter stencil

Using a letter stencil

There are many YouTube videos on using word dies on card fronts.  Boy, some cards are so awesome in their design and the creator of the cards are unbelievably talented.  I’ve wanted to make a card featuring the cut out word or phrase but I don’t have the proper dies.

I have letter stencils!

Letter stencils

Letter stencils

The trick is….turn the patterned paper  you wish to use over to the back side.  Also do the same with the letter stencil, turn it over so it is backwards.  The letter tracing will be from the RIGHT to the LEFT instead of how we normally read – Left to Right.

Backward stencil and back side of paper

Backward stencil and back side of paper

Carefully cut out the traced areas.  Make sure to go slow.  You can use the cut out parts on another card.

Use the positive and the negative

Use the positive and the negative

I was going to use my Tombow glue to attach these pieces but it didn’t want to come out.  I had to use Glossy Accents.  Worked fabulous on the large cut out piece, but got pretty messy on the cut away letters.

Glossy Accents

Glossy Accents

A bit messy from Glossy Accents

A bit messy from Glossy Accents

I have not used my little Xyron Sticker Maker in a long time.  Since I’ve already messed up the front of the letter piece with glue showing I might as well make it really shiny 😀

Xyron Sticker Maker

Xyron Sticker Maker

Glitter

Glitter

As a newby card maker or even a scrapbook layout person, don’t get yourself all boxed into the belief that you “HAVE TO HAVE” specific machines and tools to do what you want to do.  There is, ALWAYS, a way to do what you want.

I had my Chemo Port implanted yesterday while my tutorial video was going up.  Joe is out of town and will be home Sunday.  My neighbor was very kind to take me to the hospital and come and get me when the procedure was done.  What you see here is one drugged up woman 😀

Chemo Port implant

Chemo Port implant

Hope you all have a wonderful weekend.  Those of you that have been in the path of Michael my prayers have been for your safety and comfort.  Many people will be displaced for a time, electricity will be off in some areas, scary times for everyone.

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Recommended Tools for Beginners – Part 1

Mom2Create, a subscriber to my YouTube channel, asked in a comment what tools I would recommend to beginners?  Thank you, Janette (Mom2Create) for this great question.

When I started making scrapbook layouts, way back in 2003, I watched every video I could find on the subject.  I read hundreds of internet articles on the subject.  Blog posts, HGTV’s website that offered paper crafting information, anything I could find.  I bought books and magazines dedicated to scrapbook layouts.  The magazines and videos were largely based around Sizzix die cutting machines and the various dies available.

I had a problem.  Everything I read or video I watched was geared to the crafters that had ready supplies and tools on hand.  I, basically, had nothing.

I had a grid ruler that I bought in 1993 or 1994 which I used in my sewing.  I tried my hand at quilting…..and found that to be something I did NOT enjoy one little bit.  I had fabric scissors.  That was the extent of my paper crafting hand tools.

In a state of frustration one day in 2004 I did the worst thing I could have done.  I went to my local craft/hobby store and began loading my cart with all kinds of stuff.

For one minute imagine if you will, or even remember, going into a grocery store really hungry.  You start off with good intentions to purchase the necessary food items for meals and replenish any pantry or condiment items you are out of.  PLUS you go into the grocery store without a LIST!

Everything looks good to eat.  Stomach grumbling.  Brain telling you it is time to eat.  The food items you originally went in to purchase for dinner are no longer in your memory.  In fact, you can’t remember what you went to the grocery store for in the first place.  Maybe  you’ll remember what it was as you wander the aisles.

When I got home from my shopping at the craft/hobby store I had paper.  Slabs, pads, packs, and bundles of paper.  I had rubber stamps that looked interesting.  What I didn’t have was a paper trimmer, nor did I have an ink pad to use with the rubber stamps.  I didn’t even get a pair of paper scissors.

In essence I went down the cookie aisle and loaded up with every kind of cookie I saw that looked good.

In this series of videos and blog posts I am going to start with the rudimentary tools a person needs to begin paper crafting.  The items I have chosen to start this series are essentials that will be your foundation.  With these few tools….scissors, rulers, bone folders, and craft knife……you can create anything with these simple tools.

Foundation hand tools for your paper crafting

Foundation hand tools for your paper crafting

I have a YouTube video demonstrating these tools.  What to look for, which tool to choose for your needs.  I tell you why you need two pairs of scissors.  One for paper and one for fabric (ribbons, lace) and what to look for when buying a pair of scissors.

I have a pair of kitchen shears that I use frequently.  These are really OLD and at one time they were top of the line in the scissor world.  Wiss brand.  Over the years they have been used by others that have put them to work in situations and places that I will never visit.  The blades are separated and cause problems from time to time.

When purchasing scissors look closely at them closed.  There should NOT be a gap between the closed blades.

There should be NO gap between the closed blades

There should be NO gap between the closed blades

Here is the first video in the series.  Maybe I will remind a long time crafter of what they did in the early days of their creating. Or maybe give you a tip that makes placing letter stickers in position easily.

Getting started making your book.

BEFORE you begin the process of cutting on the text shapes for your book you need to think about the finished project.  Is it going to be….

  • Using brown paper bags for book pages
  • Using thick card stock to mat the text shapes and photos
  • How will your book be set up for page flipping
  • What type of binding are  you going to use
  • Will you use the accordion style hinge using card stock
  • Will you be using a binding machine like a Bind-It-All or a Cinch
  • Will you use a spiral binding or a metal binding with the machines

ALL of these considerations need to be thought out before you begin cutting away at your text shapes for your book.  Once you cut out the shape there is no going back…unless you reprint the page and start over.

Story page 1

Story page 1

If you have a style of mini album making you are comfortable with and want to stick with that there is no reason to change what you are comfortable with.  Cut out the shapes and mount them to card stock.  Crop  your photos to fit your pages and your style and do what you are good at.

I, however, like to write checks my mind is not prepared to cash :/  Complicated works of art seem to be my forte.  People with common sense say “Whoa!  That woman has done lost her mind if she thinks I’m going to jump off the cliff with her!”

Feel free to use my “Mentoring” as a guide.  Do what you can and are able to do with your skill level.

Now on to the show.

Cut the shape away from the paper.  Leave some room all around the shape for the actual part of the fiddly bits.  Using a ruler, make a straight pencil line on both the top and bottom of the image.  Draw the line from edge to edge.  As you can see in the photo below.

Draw a straight line at top and bottom of image

Draw a straight line at top and bottom of image

Carefully, with scissors or a craft knife, cut along the pencil lines.  Then where the image and pencil lines intersect cut away the paper along the image border.  As shown in the photo below.

Cut the image as shown

Cut the image as shown

When it comes to images that are not circular do the same thing with the ruler and pencil to define the area.  As the example below of an arrow shape.  Draw the bottom line along the bottom of the arrow and extend it outward a bit.

 

Draw a straight line along the bottom of the image

Draw a straight line along the bottom of the image

Draw a straight line along the top of the image and extend it out a little ways.  As seen in the next photo.

Draw a straight line across the top of the image

Draw a straight line across the top of the image

Cut along the bottom line until you come to the edge of the shape that moves upwards.  Follow the image border until you get to the top pencil line then continue cutting to the outer edge.  See the photo below.

 

Cut around the image leaving a margin on the side

Cut around the image leaving a margin on the side

When you have completed cutting out all the images in this fashion the next thing to do is to trace around the images on chipboard.

THIS IS AN IMPORTANT NOTE:  Make sure to LEAVE 1/2 inch of open space between the image and the edge of the chipboard before you trace the image.  This will give you the area necessary for binding.

Lay your image on the chipboard.  Aline the outer edge of the image 1/2 inch from the edge of the chipboard.  Draw around the cut out shape.  As you go along your chipboard will look like this.

Leave 1/2 inch space from image edge to paper margin

Leave 1/2 inch space from image edge to paper margin

Trace around the image shape.

Trace the image

Trace the image

Go on to the next shape and trace around it.

Trace around the next image

Trace around the next image

Continue tracing your images until you have finished with the last one.

Trace around all your images

Trace around all your images

NOTE:  A helpful thing to do.  On the back side of your image write a number and place that same number on the chipboard traced item.  See the photo below to understand what I have just said :/

 

Number the back side of the image and the corresponding traced image

Number the back side of the image and the corresponding traced image

This will help you keep track of the images and the chipboard pieces once they are cut out.

The placement on the chipboard is not important.  ONLY having the margin along the chipboard edges.  You will have some images upside down in orientation.

Images in traced out places

Images in traced out places

Along the straight lines of your images you can use a metal ruler and the craft knife for your cuts.

Use a metal ruler and craft knife on straight cuts

Use a metal ruler and craft knife on straight cuts

The curved areas are just a tad bit tricky.  You will have to GO SLOW in cutting around the curves.  Start at the cut area of the straight part then carefully work your way around the curve.  You will need to make a minimum of three passes with the craft knife to cut cleanly through the chipboard.

Carefully cut along the curve with the craft knife

Carefully cut along the curve with the craft knife

When you have cut all the way through the shape will easily release from the chipboard.  Keep cutting until the piece comes free with gentle pressure.

DON’T YANK THE PIECE.  You will tear it and then have to start over.  There will be utterances made by you children should not hear :/

Sorry about the out of focus photo :/

Cut around the curve shape then gently pull to release the shape

Cut around the curve shape then gently pull to release the shape

Get your pieces all cut out.  You will be ready to do something else by this time.  If only to give your hands and fingers a rest.

 

Pieces cut out

Pieces cut out

Don’t get upset about the pointy edges that will appear from your cuts.  This is no big thing.

Don't worry about the pointy bits

Don’t worry about the pointy bits

When you have sufficiently recovered from the strenuous task of earlier….you will need to use a sanding block or an Emory board to sand off the sharp point.

Sanding block

Sanding block

Now you see it….

Pointy bit

Pointy bit

Now you DON’T see it.

 

Sanded off point

Sanded off point

I think this is enough for today.  Besides, Joe is in need of my “gofer” skills :/

Leslie

The definition of Insanity is…..

DOING THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER EXPECTING DIFFERENT RESULTS!

After having been successful in making the file folder box I figured it would be a snap to reduce the size to make a box to hold greeting cards and a smaller box to hold index cards for the way too many Internet sites and passwords I have and can’t seem to remember.

Two attempts were made to create a box that measures 6-3/8 inches wide by 4-3/4 inches tall and 1-1/2 inches deep, with a flap.

Two attempts to make the same box

Two attempts to make the same box

I gave up on the greeting card boxes because they were just way too wonky and I didn’t like the way they were coming together.

The next box I began was for an even smaller version of these two boxes.  Yep.  If you can’t figure out how to make something one size it is always worth while to go SMALLER :/

What the heck was I thinking?!

Smaller box

Smaller box

These boxes made from cardboard are quite thick.  They are very sturdy and can be used for heavy objects.  The only problem is they are too thick, clumsy, and labor intensive.  Mass producing these boxes would take quite a lot of time.

To decrease the bulk of the boxes I decided to give chipboard a try.  One 8-1/2 x 11 inch piece of chipboard will ALMOST make the greeting card box.  I had to get into my scrap pile for the extra chipboard for the lid and the flap.

You can see the measurements I have made on the chipboard….just in case you wish to make one of the greeting card boxes.

 

Measurements on sheet of chipboard

Measurements on sheet of chipboard

Measurements on scrap of chipboard

Measurements on scrap of chipboard

This is the order you would lay the pieces on the paper you choose to cover with.

Layout of pieces

Layout of pieces

This layout is too long for  a 12 x 12 sheet of scrapbook paper.  I had to use a bit of a matching paper for the lid and the flap.  That was a bug a boo to figure out  how to attach.

 

Attaching the lid and flap

Attaching the lid and flap

NOTE TO SELF:  Next time choose a paper with one design element featuring smaller images.

 

Attaching the lid and flap extension

Attaching the lid and flap extension

This is how the pieces will be laid out on the paper you choose.

Laid out on paper

Laid out on paper

When this box is finished it will hold 10 greeting cards with envelopes.

Holds 10 cards with envelopes

Holds 10 cards with envelopes

Magnets - they will be the death of me

Magnets – they will be the death of me

The extension

The extension

After battling the greeting card box, and having a little more success….I’m still not totally thrilled with how it has come out.  Especially the flippin’ MAGNETS!  I decided to turn my focus to the smaller box for the Internet passwords.

This box will use a half sheet of 8-1/2 x 11 chipboard.  The measurements are shown below.  Please note the change to three of the measurements.  Don’t ask me where my head was during this process.  I don’t have a clue what I was thinking.

Measurements on chipboard

Measurements on chipboard

Lay the pieces out on the decorative paper of your choice in this layout.  When attaching the chipboard to the paper I moved it over to the right edge and in 3/4 of an inch.

 

Laid out on paper

Laid out on paper

When completed, this box has thinner edges than the cardboard, which I was happier with.  The box itself was more square and less wonky.

 

Cardboard and chipboard comparison

Cardboard and chipboard comparison

The index cards for the Internet site and password file are 2-1/2 inches by 3 inches.  I found these at my local office supply store.

Index cards

Index cards

I will not be doing a full fledged tutorial on the construction of these boxes UNTIL I get the blasted things figured out.  I don’t like the side flaps showing on the front of the box.  Might as well have a “Mickey Mouse” image on this box.

Box with index cards

Box with index cards

Yes, and you can totally forget about the addition of any MAGNETS to close the box with.  I think I will be going back to my old friend – Velcro.  Velcro loves me and I love it back.

Here is a sample of how to use the index cards for the passwords.

 

Index card ready for info

Index card ready for info

I think I’m going to find something mindless to do for the next few hours.  My brain hurts :/

Go, “Show someone how special they are”.

Leslie

How to make a file folder box – The beginning

Are you ready for another long ride?  No, no, no.  It is not about cleaning my craft room.  I promise!  This is about making a file folder box.  Like this one I made on Sunday.

File folder box

File folder box

As you know, my posts are ALWAYS photo heavy.  This one has to be broken up into bite sized chunks.  Although it took me only about four hours to make this box from scratch, there is a ton of stuff involved in making this thing.  The file folders, actually, fit in this box and there is plenty of room for growth.

File folders in the box

File folders in the box

You will need some cardboard that will be 12 inches by 36 inches.  A giant box will work for this.  As you know, I have sheets of cardboard for projects like this.  I get mine from my local Budget Box and Bag store.

Sheets of cardboard

Sheets of cardboard

These sheets of cardboard are what get placed on top of forklift pallets to keep product from falling through the slats.  These sheets are also placed on top of a full forklift pallet as a buffer when another pallet is stacked on top.

I had to take one  sheet out to my kitchen and put it on the floor.  I then sneaked into my  husband’s office – while he is not home – and “borrowed” a straight edge.  Shhhhh.  Don’t tell him.

 

On the kitchen floor

On the kitchen floor

Using my trusty ruler, I made tick marks the width of the cardboard at 12 inches.  If my math is correct I will only need to cut one (1) of these 12 x 36 pieces.

Using the straight edge I lined it up on my tick marks and used my pencil to connect the dots.

Make tick marks across at 12 inches

Make tick marks across at 12 inches

Use a straight edge to connect the dots

Use a straight edge to connect the dots

 

Perfect line

Perfect line

Next stash of my husband’s to raid is his wood pile.  I need a board that will span the width of the cardboard and be wide enough so I can cut through it.  I have placed the board under the cardboard and under the line to be cut.

Raid the wood pile

Raid the wood pile

Wood placed under the cardboard

Wood placed under the cardboard

With the cardboard sandwiched between the piece of wood and the straightedge, lined up on the pencil line, it was time to make the first cut.  Make sure your craft knife has a fresh blade in it.  A dull blade will cause the cardboard to tear and have jagged lines.  You need clean lines.

Line the straight edge up on the pencil line

Line the straight edge up on the pencil line

Make sure you have a fresh blade

Make sure you have a fresh blade

Using the straight edge as a guide, cut through the first layer of cardboard with your craft knife.  Using the straight edge for this first bit of business will keep a straight line instead of a drunken wiggly line….like I usually make.

Make your first cut through the cardboard

Make your first cut through the cardboard

Move the straight edge out of the way.  Place your craft knife at the top of the cut you  just made and carefully cut through the bottom layer of cardboard.  Make double sure before you start this that your cardboard is on the wood.  Don’t need to cut through your flooring :/

Cut through the bottom layer of the cardboard

Cut through the bottom layer of the cardboard

Now, with much creaking, groaning, popping, and snapping get yourself up off the floor.  Take a moment to make the dizzy go away or let the blood get back down from your face before you run around your house with a sharp knife.

I put everything back where I found it.  Husband will never know I had entered his domain and tampered with his goods.  That is if he doesn’t read my blog :/  Then I’ll have some explaining to do.  I can always bat my eyes at him.  That usually works well 😀

Tomorrow.  The big honkin industrial paper cutter gets off the floor and onto the table.  I will have all the measurements tomorrow for the cuts that will be made to create this file folder box.   See…I was still a bit dizzy when I took this photo.

Industrial paper cutter

Industrial paper cutter

Don’t worry .  You don’t need an industrial paper cutter for this job.  A sharp craft knife, self healing mat, and a straight edge is what you will need.  I have the monster machine and might as well use it.

I guess I ought to ask….Are you guys even interested in finding out how to create a file folder box?

What have you been doing to “Show someone how special they are”?

Leslie

 

How to cover chipboard with paper.

Okay, this one you will have to use your imagination a little bit.  I got so carried away with attaching the paper to the chipboard pieces I forgot to take photos of the process.

I’m using liquid glue to attach the papers.  The first thing to do is get the adhesive of  your choice on the chipboard first.  Use a tape runner, Scor-Tape, red liner tape, wet glue, Mod Podge, whatever you prefer.  Get the adhesive to all outer edges of the chipboard and in the middle section.

Attach the paper you have chosen.  You can cut the paper ahead of time if you know the dimensions.  I cut the papers at 3-1/2 inches by 8-1/2 inches to cover the off cuts from the chipboard I cut in the previous post.  For this process I prefer using liquid glue.  I have a small window of time to move the paper around to fit properly by using the glue.  I don’t have much success with the dry adhesives.  I have ruined too much paper and chipboard when the danged dry adhesive sticks to the chipboard in the wrong place :/

Adhere the paper to the chipboard

Adhere the paper to the chipboard

BEFORE you mount the paper on the back side of the chipboard piece make sure to punch the holes for the notebook binding.  Want to have a swear session?  Just cover the both sides of the chipboard and hunt around for the holes :/  Trust me….I’ve done this a time or two and I speak from experience.

Punch any holes before you do the back

Punch any holes before you do the back

Now you can safely cover the back of the chipboard.  The holes will be easy to punch because you have taken the time to do it on the front side.

 

Cover the back side and punch any holes

Cover the back side and punch any holes

The problem with using a liquid glue in this application is the water content that soaks into the chipboard and causes the pieces to warp.  Don’t worry.  I have my “highly technical” press ready.  Using wax paper, place a sheet on a flat surface.  In this case it is my cleared off kitchen table.  Lay the glued pieces atop the wax paper and put another layer of wax paper on top of this.  Continue with your wax paper and glued chipboard sandwich.  When all pieces are ready for the press put something flat over the top of the “sandwich” and then add some weight.

 

Warping chipboard

Warping chipboard

Sandwich chipboard pieces to dry between wax paper

Sandwich chipboard pieces to dry between wax paper

Place something flat over the sandwich

Place something flat over the sandwich

Place something heavy to act as a press

Place something heavy to act as a press

For the larger pages with the tabbed dividers I had to go through my stash of 12 x 12 papers to.  I didn’t have the foresight to purchase extra paper when I went shopping.  So I will have to find paper from my stash that will compliment the colors of the new stuff.

Creative Imaginations

Creative Imaginations

Creative Imaginations

Creative Imaginations

Imaginisce

Imaginisce

Club Scrap

Club Scrap

Use the adhesive of your choice to the chipboard and lay it out on the paper you will cover the glued side with.  Once the paper is fully adhered use a craft knife to cut around the chipboard piece.  Remember to punch your holes before covering the other side.

Attaching the paper and cutting around the chipboard

Attaching the paper and cutting around the chipboard

This new thing I am attempting to do….Put Things Away….is getting easier to do.  I still have to talk to myself and make sure that I do it :/  The bag which held my purchases is coming in handy for this project.  All the papers are together.

Clean up as I go

Clean up as I go

I like coming into my “Studio” now.  Space for mojo to happen 😀

 

Orderly work table

Orderly work table

I hope this has been of help to anyone that is thinking about covering chipboard with paper.  Now I have to put these pages under my press and wait until tomorrow to begin the hard part.  Designing the layouts.

Leslie

 

How to make chipboard mini album pages.

About two years ago I read a comment on a YouTube video, don’t remember which one it was though.   The viewer asked if there was anywhere to find out how to make a mini album from start to finish.  At first the question seemed strange.  Then I remembered how I felt when I first heard about mini albums and watched one video after another of finished products.  The same question banged about in my head.  How does one go about starting the whole process?

That viewer is probably now making some of those fantastic mini albums after having gone through the learning curve all by themselves.  I am going to create a series of blog posts all about creating a mini album.  From start to finish.  Since I am making one for my granddaughter’s birthday I figure now would be a good time to document the process.

There are many phases to creating a mini album.  There are many types of mini albums as well.  Paper bag minis which make use of the brown paper lunch bag.  Card stock mini albums that are made entirely of card stock and patterned papers.  The sizes range from 3 inches to 9 inches.  The “standard” seem to be having 6 to 8 pages in the album with a ton of pockets.  I deal with that feature in a later post.  Right now I want to just focus on how to begin.

This mini album will be for an 8 inch by 9 inch, three ring binder.  It will also feature chipboard as the page bases throughout.

STEP ONE:  You have to decide on the size of your mini album.  Then you have to decide what you will use as the base pages for the actual function of the mini album.

STEP TWO:  You  have to think about the “Sections” of your mini album. Are they all going to be the same?  A wedding theme?  A new baby?  A birthday?  A family reunion?  This type of mini album will not need to have dividers, or sections.

My granddaughter’s mini album will feature sections for friends, family, sports, and her precious self.  I want to take a “moment”, if you will, of her life and hold it for safe keeping for her.  Over the coming years she can look back and remember the fun she had with her friends, the soccer (football) games she played in, her quirky little brother, and what her life was like as a 15 year old young woman.

STEP THREE:  Choose the photos you want to use in the mini album.  You can check out my previous post about how I chose the photos.

STEP FOUR:  Gather your supplies.  I purchased some of the components for this mini album from a local scrapbook store.  Not from one of the major chains of crafting stores.

My supplies

My supplies

This mini album will be a notebook type.  I purchased a Bo Bunny 8 inch by 9 inch chipboard bound three ring binder that was empty.  Had no papers or plastic holders inside.  There was an assortment of books available that included the papers, plastic photo sleeves, and other decorative items.  I did not like what I saw for the paper choices and chose to make my own.

 

Bo Bunny 8 x 9 binder

Bo Bunny 8 x 9 binder

Now the process begins.  Get a scrap piece of paper that is long enough to fit the length of the binder you have chosen.

Scrap paper to make the ring  holes

Scrap paper to make the ring holes

As even as you can possibly get it, place the scrap piece of paper between the ring jaws and close them on the paper.  You will make an indentation on the scrap paper where the rings close.

Close the rings on the scrap paper

Close the rings on the scrap paper

Measure and draw a pencil line 1/2 inch from the edge of the scrap paper.  Find the ring binder indentations on the paper and mark their placement on this scrap.

Draw a line 1/2 inch from the paper edge

Draw a line 1/2 inch from the paper edge

Make a circle on the line where the binding closed

Make a circle on the line where the binding closed

Check to make sure these marked areas line up with the binder jaws.

Make sure the circles match the rings

Make sure the circles match the rings

Make any adjustments now.  It is necessary if you want the pages to fit properly.  When everything lines up punch the holes in the scrap paper guide.  Test your “guide” for fit and make any adjustments now.

Punch holes in the scrap paper guide

Punch holes in the scrap paper guide

For the chipboard pages of this album I will be using four (4) sheets of 8-1/2 by 11.  You can use cereal boxes cut to the size you need.  Have some lined paper pads?  Take the backer board from the paper pad and use it.

8-1/2 x 11 chipboard sheet

8-1/2 x 11 chipboard sheet

I am cutting the chipboard at 7-1/2 inches along the 11 inch length.

 

Measure 7-1/2 inches

Measure 7-1/2 inches

Using a craft knife cut the chipboard

Using a craft knife cut the chipboard

I will be using the “off cuts” in this mini album as pages, too.  I won’t be discarding the short pieces.

I want to have tabbed dividers in this album.  If you would like to as well, find something with a tab on it.  Notebook plastic tabbed dividers, chipboard dividers, recipe card dividers.  Whatever you wish to use as a template.

Find a template

Find a template

Line up your template to the starting tab placement you want to establish as the start.  Trace around your template with a pencil.  Take the next page and move the template over for the placement of the next tab.  Continue drawing and marking your template piece on your base pieces until you have completed this step.

Align the template to the first sheet

Align the template to the first sheet

Draw around the template

Draw around the template

Line up the second sheet and mark the placement

Line up the second sheet and mark the placemen

Do the same for the third

Do the same for the third

Continue until you have them all marked

Continue until you have them all marked

Using the craft knife and a metal edged ruler cut along your pencil marks on each of the tabbed divider sheets.

Using a craft knife cut along the pencil line

Using a craft knife cut along the pencil line

At the tabbed area cut on an angle

At the tabbed area cut on an angle

Your first tab is created

Your first tab is created

Continue the process until you have finished

Continue the process until you have finished

Using your “hole guide” line up the scrap piece with the bottom edge of your chipboard where you will make the holes.  Make sure the template is even along the bottom and one of the outer edges.  Mark the hole alignment with a pencil.  Cut out the holes and then test fit these pages in your binder.

Bring your hole template to the pages

Bring your hole template to the pages

Line the template along the bottom and one side

Line the template along the bottom and one side

Mark the hole placement

Mark the hole placement

Punch the holes

Punch the holes

Test fit the pages in your binder

Test fit the pages in your binder

That’s enough for today.  Tomorrow we will tackle the project of covering your chipboard with papers.

The easy part has just been finished.  I hope you will stick with me as I go along this journey into enlightenment 😀

 

Leslie

 

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