The definition of Insanity is…..

DOING THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER EXPECTING DIFFERENT RESULTS!

After having been successful in making the file folder box I figured it would be a snap to reduce the size to make a box to hold greeting cards and a smaller box to hold index cards for the way too many Internet sites and passwords I have and can’t seem to remember.

Two attempts were made to create a box that measures 6-3/8 inches wide by 4-3/4 inches tall and 1-1/2 inches deep, with a flap.

Two attempts to make the same box

Two attempts to make the same box

I gave up on the greeting card boxes because they were just way too wonky and I didn’t like the way they were coming together.

The next box I began was for an even smaller version of these two boxes.  Yep.  If you can’t figure out how to make something one size it is always worth while to go SMALLER :/

What the heck was I thinking?!

Smaller box

Smaller box

These boxes made from cardboard are quite thick.  They are very sturdy and can be used for heavy objects.  The only problem is they are too thick, clumsy, and labor intensive.  Mass producing these boxes would take quite a lot of time.

To decrease the bulk of the boxes I decided to give chipboard a try.  One 8-1/2 x 11 inch piece of chipboard will ALMOST make the greeting card box.  I had to get into my scrap pile for the extra chipboard for the lid and the flap.

You can see the measurements I have made on the chipboard….just in case you wish to make one of the greeting card boxes.

 

Measurements on sheet of chipboard

Measurements on sheet of chipboard

Measurements on scrap of chipboard

Measurements on scrap of chipboard

This is the order you would lay the pieces on the paper you choose to cover with.

Layout of pieces

Layout of pieces

This layout is too long for  a 12 x 12 sheet of scrapbook paper.  I had to use a bit of a matching paper for the lid and the flap.  That was a bug a boo to figure out  how to attach.

 

Attaching the lid and flap

Attaching the lid and flap

NOTE TO SELF:  Next time choose a paper with one design element featuring smaller images.

 

Attaching the lid and flap extension

Attaching the lid and flap extension

This is how the pieces will be laid out on the paper you choose.

Laid out on paper

Laid out on paper

When this box is finished it will hold 10 greeting cards with envelopes.

Holds 10 cards with envelopes

Holds 10 cards with envelopes

Magnets - they will be the death of me

Magnets – they will be the death of me

The extension

The extension

After battling the greeting card box, and having a little more success….I’m still not totally thrilled with how it has come out.  Especially the flippin’ MAGNETS!  I decided to turn my focus to the smaller box for the Internet passwords.

This box will use a half sheet of 8-1/2 x 11 chipboard.  The measurements are shown below.  Please note the change to three of the measurements.  Don’t ask me where my head was during this process.  I don’t have a clue what I was thinking.

Measurements on chipboard

Measurements on chipboard

Lay the pieces out on the decorative paper of your choice in this layout.  When attaching the chipboard to the paper I moved it over to the right edge and in 3/4 of an inch.

 

Laid out on paper

Laid out on paper

When completed, this box has thinner edges than the cardboard, which I was happier with.  The box itself was more square and less wonky.

 

Cardboard and chipboard comparison

Cardboard and chipboard comparison

The index cards for the Internet site and password file are 2-1/2 inches by 3 inches.  I found these at my local office supply store.

Index cards

Index cards

I will not be doing a full fledged tutorial on the construction of these boxes UNTIL I get the blasted things figured out.  I don’t like the side flaps showing on the front of the box.  Might as well have a “Mickey Mouse” image on this box.

Box with index cards

Box with index cards

Yes, and you can totally forget about the addition of any MAGNETS to close the box with.  I think I will be going back to my old friend – Velcro.  Velcro loves me and I love it back.

Here is a sample of how to use the index cards for the passwords.

 

Index card ready for info

Index card ready for info

I think I’m going to find something mindless to do for the next few hours.  My brain hurts :/

Go, “Show someone how special they are”.

Leslie

Making a File Box – Part 3

Today, we are going to be putting the box together.  Seriously, this is simple to do.  The one thing I can tell you that is an absolute MUST is to have smooth cuts on your cardboard.  The pieces fit better when there are no wavy cuts or jagged edges bunging up the works.

File folder box

File folder box

Transform that box, in the photo above, into this box by following the steps below for the construction.

Finished file box

Finished file box

 

First thing to do is prep your work surface.  Whether you use liquid glue or a dry adhesive, such as Scor-Tape, you will need to have a containment area to keep all the gooey stuff from getting all over your table.  Personally, I like to use Freezer Paper.

Freezer paper

Freezer paper

Freezer paper has a slick side and a paper side.  The slick side will be UP, facing you.  Spread it out on your work surface and tape it down with some painters tape.

Use painters tape to hold the paper down

Use painters tape to hold the paper down

Get your supply of “structure strips” ready.  The adhesive you use is a personal choice.  Liquid adhesive or dry adhesive.  Doesn’t matter, they both accomplish the same objective…getting the strips to attach to the cardboard.  I prefer liquid glue.  Squirt some on, spread it around, then attach to the cardboard.  I’m all for saving time and being efficient.

Having to pull out a length of the dry adhesive, make sure it gets attached in the correct place, fussing with it and using a bone folder to make sure of good adhesion to the strip, then dealing with the paper covers.  Pulling the paper off the glue strip, containing the growing piles, chasing them on the floor because I missed the trash bag.  Then having no “Forgiveness” in the process.  When the dry adhesive gets attached it is there forever.  Liquid glue I can move the piece about to get it positioned right.

Round up your supplies

Round up your supplies

Fold one of the strips at the score line you had made and apply your adhesive….or apply your dry adhesive then fold on the score mark.  Smear out the liquid glue with a sponge brush then attach the strip to the bottom edge of the FILE BOX BACK piece.  That will be one of the 12 inch by 10 inch pieces.  Make sure you don’t put the folded area at the edge of your box piece.  Leave a small gap with the fold line showing.

Apply

Apply glue

It is vital that you get the adhesive out to the very edges of the strip.  Leaving a long worm of glue and calling it good is NOT good

Smear

Smear

Attach

Attach

Apply pressure and rub on the cardboard to fully engage the glued strip to the cardboard.  Turn the cardboard over and apply pressure along the length of the glued strip to ensure full adhesion.

Press firmly, front and back, for proper adhesion

Press firmly, front and back, for proper adhesion

If you need to add a bit of strip to a shorter length it is easy as cutting a piece to the length needed then glue it on, or if there is excess strip hanging off one side then snip it away.

Locate your BOTTOM piece.  This will be one of the 3 inch by 12 inch pieces.  Run glue the length of the exposed strip (or peel off the backing from the dry adhesive).  Smear the glue to the edges.  Butt the cardboard pieces together and raise the strip to be attached to the bottom piece.  Firmly rub the glued strip to get it adhered well.

Locate the box bottom piece

Locate the box bottom piece

Apply glue

Apply glue

Smear glue

Smear glue

Butt the two pieces together

Butt the two pieces together

Apply pressure to the strip for good adhesion

Apply pressure to the strip for good adhesion

It will look like this when properly glued together.

Two pieces attached

Two pieces attached

Get another structure strip and apply adhesive to one half of the strip.  If using liquid glue, smear the glue to the edges.  Attach the glued side of the strip to the side of your back piece.  We will be building the side in this step.

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Attach strip to one side of the box

Attach strip to one side of the box

Locate your next piece of cardboard.  One that measures 3 inches by 10 inches.  Apply glue to the strip and butt the side piece to the back piece.

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Attach the side piece

Attach the side piece

Cut away any excess strip that overhangs.  Measure and cut a piece of structure strip that will go on the bottom and side corner.  Apply adhesive, attach the strip to the corner of the side and bottom.

Cut a piece of strip to fit on the corner

Cut a piece of strip to fit on the corner

Apply adhesive to the entire strip

Apply adhesive to the entire strip

Press firmly at this joint to assure good adhesion.  Snip away any overhang of the strip.

Attach to the corner and press firmly

Attach to the corner and press firmly

Next you will further reinforce the seams of this box by doing the following.  Get a length of structure strip and apply adhesive to the entire strip.  Make sure the creased fold is facing you.  The “Mountain” fold will be up.  Work the folded strip into the joint of the back and side pieces of the box.  Press firmly all along the strip to ensure proper adhesion.  Set the box on its side and press the strip fully.

Apply adhesive fully to the strip

Apply adhesive fully to the strip

Press the strip firmly into the joint

Press the strip firmly into the joint

Place the box on its side and apply pressure to the strip

Place the box on its side an apply pressure to the strip

You will also need to reinforce the corner where the bottom and sides meet.  Do the same as above.  Apply glue to the strip, MOUNTAIN side, press the strip into the joint and apply pressure to adhere the strip firmly.

Measure a corner piece and adhere

Measure a corner piece and adhere

Following the steps above, get your other 3 inch by 10 inch piece and adhere it to the other side of the back and bottom piece.

Attach the other side piece

Attach the other side piece

Next, we will work on the FRONT of the box.  Locate your last 10 inch by 12 inch piece.  I am going to cut a curve at the top of this piece.

Locate the other 10 inch by 12 inch piece

Locate the other 10 inch by 12 inch piece

Find the center along the 12 inch width.  I am using a thing I don’t know what it is EXCEPT it has  a curve.  I have lined up the center mark of the curve tool with the center mark on the cardboard and traced around the tool.

Find the center along the 12 inch piece

Find the center along the 12 inch length

With a craft mat under my cardboard piece, I have used a craft tool to cut on the pencil line.

Use a craft knife to cut on the pencil line

Use a craft knife to cut on the pencil line

Cut the curve away

Cut the curve away

The front of the box will look like this.

Front of box

Front of box

Back to the structure strip business to attach the front to the box.  Apply adhesive to both sides of the strip.  Making sure the adhesive goes all the way out to the edges.

Apply adhesive to the strip

Apply adhesive to the strip

Attach the strip to the box front and side corner

Attach the strip to the box front and side corner

Do the same to the other side of the box.  Make sure the edges butt up against each other as you apply the strip.

Attach the other side and front

Attach the other side and front

Look at this.  So far this is going along smoothly and is very easy to create the box.  Keep going….you are over half way finished.

Looking like a box

Looking like a box

The last part of the outside is to adhere a strip to the box bottom and front to close this up.

Last outside piece to attach

Last outside piece to attach

By now, you should have a good handle on how to use the structure strips.  The last thing to do is reinforce the inside of the box.  MOUNTAIN folds on this part.  Get the folded ridge pushed into the joints all over the inside of the box.

Reinforce the inside joints

Reinforce the inside joints

You can stop here if you don’t want to have a lid on your box.  The rest of this is how to put a lid and flap on, covering the edges, and making a cover for the curved edge.

If moving on to the lid.  Locate your last 3 inch by 12 inch piece.  Place it on top of the box opening.  If you were careful in your placement of the structure strips your box will be even and flush.  If you have a wonky box you will need to make adjustments to it now.  That will involve slitting the structure strips where the problem lies, moving the box to square, then reapplying structure strips.

Using the structure strips, attach the box lid to the BACK of the box.  Then attach the FLAP to the TOP FRONT OF THE BOX.  Doing this will make the next steps easier to handle.  You will be making a “Ditch” for the proper working of the lid and flap.

Check the fit of the lid

Check the fit of the lid

Working on the INSIDE of the lid piece.  You will need to take your structure strip to the score board and make another score 1/8 inch to the left of the center score.  You will have a “U” shape for this strip.  This is necessary.

Score 1/8 inch to left of center

Score 1/8 inch to left of center

Apply adhesive to the "U" shape

Apply adhesive to the “U” shape

Holding the lid in place, press the “U” into the joint of the lid and the top of the box.  You will need this extra bit of spacing to make the lid work properly.

Press the "U" into the joint of the lid and the top

Press the “U” into the joint of the lid and the top

Locate your final piece, the 2 inch by 12 inch piece.  Get another structure strip and score 1/8 inch to the left of center and apply the glued strip to the joint of the flap and the lid.  Make sure to apply pressure to strip on both of these pieces.

Locate the 2 inch by 12 inch piece

Locate the 2 inch by 12 inch piece

Seat the "U" into the joint of the top and flap

Seat the “U” into the joint of the top and flap

Work the flap  up and down to make sure it is secure

Work the flap up and down to make sure it is secure

Your lid and flap should be working well.  The lid will not close fully at this point.  When you cover the box, or paint it, the lid and flap will be secured with a magnet or Velcro.

Apply structure strips to the outside joints

Apply structure strips to the outside joints

Now all that is left is to cover up the raw edges of the box and lid.  Gather your structure strips and take them to the score board.  Score 1/8 inch to the left of center on a whole bunch of them.  Measure and cut a piece of strip to fit one of the side edges.  Apply adhesive and adhere the strip to the box raw edge.

Score the structure strips 1/8 inch to the left of center

Score the structure strips 1/8 inch to the left of center

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Attach to raw edge

Attach to raw edge

Continue covering your raw edges of the flap and the other side of the box.  We will deal with the curve in a moment.

Cover all the raw edges

Cover all the raw edges

Now for the curve.  Start with a long length of structure strip, crease it fully on the fold lines.  Place the strip over the front raw edge.  Note where the curve of the front begins.  Make a snip in the strip.  End the snip CLOSE TO the fold line.  NOT INTO THE FOLD.

Make snips along the length of the strip as you follow the curve.

Snip TO the crease where the curve begins

Snip TO the crease where the curve begins

Make corresponding snips on the back side of the strip.  Remember to NOT snip into the crease mark.

Make corresponding snips to the back of the strip

Make corresponding snips to the back of the strip

Test fit the snipped strip.  Add any additional snips where necessary.

Test fit the snipped strip

Test fit the snipped strip

Make more snips if necessary

Make more snips if necessary

When satisfied then this is done

When satisfied then this is done

Liberally apply adhesive to the snipped strip then attach to the box front raw edge.

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Install strip

Install strip

Apply the last bit of strip to finish off the raw edges.  Let this box set for about 24 hours for the adhesive to cure.  Even the dry adhesive needs a cure time.  You can think about what you want to do about covering the box while the adhesive cures.

I seriously  hope this tutorial has been clear and concise in my instruction and the accompanying photos.  I also hope that I have given you the confidence to give box building a try.

Are you ready to go and “Show someone how special they are”?

Leslie

How to make a file folder box – The Measurements.

This post is about the measurements and cutting the cardboard to make this file folder box.

File folder box

File folder box

You might want to take a moment and jot these measurements down.  The box parts are listed next to the dimensions.

The dimensions

The dimensions

Hefting that 50 pound…I think it gets heavier each time I lift it…..industrial paper cutter to the table.  I prepared to be underwhelmed by the cuts.  HOWEVER, this thing cuts right through cardboard as if it were a single sheet of paper.  It spits the rest of the cardboard out the back after the cut and I have to go chase after it.

Cuts like a dream

Cuts like a dream

Spits, too

Spits, too

Having the extension down didn’t help one single bit.  The cut cardboard shot right off anyway.

Using the extension

Using the extension

Here are the cuts.  Two (2) 10 inch by 12 inch.  Front and back panels.

Front and back

Front and back

Two (2) 3 inch by 12 inch.  These are the box bottom and the box top.

Top and bottom

Top and bottom

Two (2) 3 inch by 10 inch pieces for the two sides.

Two side pieces

Two side pieces

And, lastly, the flap piece.  One (1) 2 inch by 12 inch piece.

One flap piece

One flap piece

This is the scrap left over from the cutting.  Oh, and a little strip from a mis-measured piece.

Scrap cardboard

Scrap cardboard

Ooooops, measured wrong.

Oooops, measured wrong.

The last bit of cutting and prep work before building the box is about to happen.  Structure strips need to be made.  Get out your craft card stock.  I used four (4) sheets of the card stock.  Cutting the sheets into 1 inch strips.

 

Cut card stock into 1 inch strips

Cut card stock into 1 inch strips

Next, score the strips at 1/2 inch using a score board.

Structure strips will be scored

Structure strips will be scored

At 1/2 inch

At 1/2 inch

When you have finished the last strip, go take a break or do something else for a while.  Your poor finger will thank you.

 

"Groovy" finger

“Groovy” finger

Tomorrow’s post will be all about assembling the box.  Hope your finger is better by then.  It won’t have a permanent crease.  I promise.

Leslie

 

How to make a file folder box – The beginning

Are you ready for another long ride?  No, no, no.  It is not about cleaning my craft room.  I promise!  This is about making a file folder box.  Like this one I made on Sunday.

File folder box

File folder box

As you know, my posts are ALWAYS photo heavy.  This one has to be broken up into bite sized chunks.  Although it took me only about four hours to make this box from scratch, there is a ton of stuff involved in making this thing.  The file folders, actually, fit in this box and there is plenty of room for growth.

File folders in the box

File folders in the box

You will need some cardboard that will be 12 inches by 36 inches.  A giant box will work for this.  As you know, I have sheets of cardboard for projects like this.  I get mine from my local Budget Box and Bag store.

Sheets of cardboard

Sheets of cardboard

These sheets of cardboard are what get placed on top of forklift pallets to keep product from falling through the slats.  These sheets are also placed on top of a full forklift pallet as a buffer when another pallet is stacked on top.

I had to take one  sheet out to my kitchen and put it on the floor.  I then sneaked into my  husband’s office – while he is not home – and “borrowed” a straight edge.  Shhhhh.  Don’t tell him.

 

On the kitchen floor

On the kitchen floor

Using my trusty ruler, I made tick marks the width of the cardboard at 12 inches.  If my math is correct I will only need to cut one (1) of these 12 x 36 pieces.

Using the straight edge I lined it up on my tick marks and used my pencil to connect the dots.

Make tick marks across at 12 inches

Make tick marks across at 12 inches

Use a straight edge to connect the dots

Use a straight edge to connect the dots

 

Perfect line

Perfect line

Next stash of my husband’s to raid is his wood pile.  I need a board that will span the width of the cardboard and be wide enough so I can cut through it.  I have placed the board under the cardboard and under the line to be cut.

Raid the wood pile

Raid the wood pile

Wood placed under the cardboard

Wood placed under the cardboard

With the cardboard sandwiched between the piece of wood and the straightedge, lined up on the pencil line, it was time to make the first cut.  Make sure your craft knife has a fresh blade in it.  A dull blade will cause the cardboard to tear and have jagged lines.  You need clean lines.

Line the straight edge up on the pencil line

Line the straight edge up on the pencil line

Make sure you have a fresh blade

Make sure you have a fresh blade

Using the straight edge as a guide, cut through the first layer of cardboard with your craft knife.  Using the straight edge for this first bit of business will keep a straight line instead of a drunken wiggly line….like I usually make.

Make your first cut through the cardboard

Make your first cut through the cardboard

Move the straight edge out of the way.  Place your craft knife at the top of the cut you  just made and carefully cut through the bottom layer of cardboard.  Make double sure before you start this that your cardboard is on the wood.  Don’t need to cut through your flooring :/

Cut through the bottom layer of the cardboard

Cut through the bottom layer of the cardboard

Now, with much creaking, groaning, popping, and snapping get yourself up off the floor.  Take a moment to make the dizzy go away or let the blood get back down from your face before you run around your house with a sharp knife.

I put everything back where I found it.  Husband will never know I had entered his domain and tampered with his goods.  That is if he doesn’t read my blog :/  Then I’ll have some explaining to do.  I can always bat my eyes at him.  That usually works well 😀

Tomorrow.  The big honkin industrial paper cutter gets off the floor and onto the table.  I will have all the measurements tomorrow for the cuts that will be made to create this file folder box.   See…I was still a bit dizzy when I took this photo.

Industrial paper cutter

Industrial paper cutter

Don’t worry .  You don’t need an industrial paper cutter for this job.  A sharp craft knife, self healing mat, and a straight edge is what you will need.  I have the monster machine and might as well use it.

I guess I ought to ask….Are you guys even interested in finding out how to create a file folder box?

What have you been doing to “Show someone how special they are”?

Leslie

 

Whoa! That’s not trash!

I have to confess.  I am a bit of a hoarder.  I keep things that other people would consider quickly tossing in the recycling bin.  Case in point….plastic packaging and product cardboard packing.

Plastic packaging

Plastic packaging

Product cardboard

Product cardboard

I’m going to make you wait until the end of this post to see the results.  Hopefully it will change your mind about keeping stuff you might otherwise throw away.

Let’s start with the plastic packaging.  A pillow box which held some Tim Holtz embossing folders. Cut off one side of the packaging.

Tim Holtz embossing folder package

Tim Holtz embossing folder package

Cut away one side

Cut away one side

I’m going to be using a Stampin’ Up! Top Note die on this plastic piece.  Use a small amount of tape to hold the slippery plastic in place when die cutting.

Stampin' Up! Top Note die

Stampin’ Up! Top Note die

Secure the plastic with a bit of tape

Secure the plastic with a bit of tape

Cool!  Acetate die cut

Cool! Acetate die cut

Now for the cardboard.  This is one of the end flaps from a box of FoodSaver plastic rolls I use.

Product cardboard

Product cardboard

The die I will be using is an old Sizzix die.  An old telephone.  With a curly cord and rotary dial.  I’ve had this die for quite a number of years.  You can use any die you wish, I’m just showing you what I used.

Sizzix telephone die

Sizzix telephone die

Die cut the cardboard, then die cut card stock in the color of your choice.  Then glue the card stock to the cardboard die cut.

Die cut the cardboard

Die cut the cardboard

Die cut card stock

Die cut card stock

Put the pieces together

Put the pieces together

Presto!  Chango!  *flash of bright light and a bit of smoke in the air*

 

Top Note acetate die cut with bling

Top Note acetate die cut with bling

Telephone cardboard die cut

Telephone cardboard die cut

Both of these die cuts are being used to  hold the photos in place.  The sticker tags are also being used as added grip to keep the photos from falling out.  I’ve used Glue Dots on the acetate die cut and Red Liner tape on the bottom portion of the telephone.

I hope this has given you a bit of inspiration for your creative day.

Now….go “Show someone how special they are”.

Leslie

 

 

 

 

 

 

The future home of book binding supplies.

Today I am in the right most cupboard above my work table.  I have four cupboards on this wall and this is the one that has been the hardest to get to because I have my other video making light attached to one of the door handles.

Oh, look at this!  A clean work surface.  This photo was taken in October.  I needed to see that!  There is still hope for a clean work table.

Right side video making light

Right side video making light

Are you ready for this?  Seriously!  Are you ready.  I’m not.  There are a couple of sad stories about to be told with this cupboard.

 

The sad before

The sad before

The cardboard box to the right on the bottom shelf.  I hang my head in shame.  This is the box I received from my friend, Lynn, who lives in the UK.  She sent this to me for Christmas of 2010.  The bag of chocolate candy Maltesers are still unopened.  Don’t think I will be opening them now.  Lynn was so sweet to send them to me.  They are similar to the “Whopper” candy malt balls in the US.

Long forgotten Christmas gift

Long forgotten Christmas gift

The little box to the side of the candy is one hand made by Lynn.  A gorgeous box that holds delightful sparkly bits inside.

Beautiful handmade flowers and snowflakes

Beautiful handmade flowers and snowflakes

Lynn also included some very interesting photo frames that I have been wanting to use but could never remember where I had put them :/

Lovely photo frames

Lovely photo frames

Now you know my shameful secret *sigh*.

Moving along.  In this cupboard are numerous empty tin cans.  Don’t have a clue why I have saved them.  One of them I think will work for my embossing powders.

Empty tin

Empty tin

New home for my embossing powders

New home for my embossing powders

The next crazy tale is a box over flowing with motel room keys.  While doing my truck driving job we spent about 250 nights a year away from home.  Someone told us our private information was put on the magnetic strip of the hotel key.  Of course….we panicked and kept all of the keys.

Messy box of motel keys

Messy box of motel keys

Neat box of motel keys

Neat box of motel keys

I had a brilliant idea.  Alter the motel keys and make Christmas themed tags from them.  That is still an idea I am going to work on.  Make them everyday tags as well.

Christmas themed tags from motel keys

Christmas themed tags from motel keys

Working at getting my floor cleared so I don’t kill myself in this mess of a room.  I decided this cupboard would be the right place to hold all of my book binding supplies.  Chipboard, lined note pads, Post-It-Notes, scrap chipboard, scrap pieces of cardboard, scrap pieces of Foam Core board, and other similar items.  So the first item to get up off the floor is my stash of chipboard.

Box of chipboard sheets

Box of chipboard sheets

Now I can say that my book binding supplies are all in one place.  I even found a home for the beautiful cardboard boxes I made back in October.

From CRAP!

The sad before

The sad before

To FAB!

Book binding supplies.  Fabulous

Book binding supplies. Fabulous!

Oh and I will be keeping this giant postage stamp from the UK.  See.  Christmas of 2010 :/

Postage stamp from the UK

Postage stamp from the UK

Do you have any dirty little secrets hiding in your cupboards?  I don’t know about you but mine seem to be chalk full of them :/

Leslie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I Double Dog Dare You to make some tags using scrapbook sticker sheets!.

I got sidetracked.

My intention was to get in my craft room and begin purging.  Clear out the massive amount of crap I have in there so I can find a home for the new paper cutter Joe got me.

I did make a start.  I have several 13″ x 13″ pocket folders chock full of sticker sheets.  Most of them are missing stickers.  While going through the file pockets and trying to sort the stuff I could purge…an idea struck.

Here is a sample of the condition of my sticker sheets.

Partially used sticker sheet.

Partially used sticker sheet.

I didn’t feel right in putting that in a pile to give to someone.  Frankly, if I received this sticker sheet from someone I think I might have thoughts of passing it on to someone else.  The images are photo quality.  Burlap images.  Button images, quite a number of them are stuck to the inside of the plastic file pocket I had this stored in.  I bought this sheet somewhere around 2007.  I don’t even know what I have used it on.

I have a challenge for you.  Nay.  I  dare you!  I dare you to do the following:

Paw through your stash of sticker sheets and select one.   Any one.

Locate your stash of chipboard.  Haul out  your stash of saved cereal boxes.

Find your cache of chipboard pieces or cereal boxes

Find your cache of chipboard pieces or cereal boxes

Grab a spool of lace trim.  This is the only lace trim that I have so I have used it.

Locate your stash of lace trim

Locate your stash of lace trim

I have a small stash of burlap that has been crammed away in a drawer for about 5 years.

Small stash of burlap

Small stash of burlap

Get your stash of small flowers.  No bigger than 1-1/4 inches.  This is just a tray that was easy for me to get to and it has a mix of flowers in it.

My stash of small flowers

My stash of small flowers

If  you have made decorative pins, bring them out.

My pitiful stash of stick pins

My pitiful stash of stick pins

Do you have some glittered up chipboard embellishments?  Well, what’s taking you so long?  Get them located.

Glittered chipboard embellishments

Glittered chipboard embellishments

Use some acrylic paint.  I’ve chosen to use my long neglected Acrylic Paint Daubers from Ranger Industries.

Sunshine Yellow

Sunshine Yellow

Snow Cap

Snow Cap

Red Pepper

Red Pepper

While you are digging around in your sticker stash find some other long forgotten pieces, too.

Sticker embellishments

Sticker embellishments

Last thing is some 1/4″ ribbon.  If you don’t have the eyelets to punch and adhere to the tags, you can always use a trusty stapler.

Okay.  Are you ready?  Need some inspiration?  Need a gift tag or two?  In desperate need of having some decorative tags that coordinate with the mini album or scrapbook layouts you are working on?  Out of money and can’t go to the store to buy some ready made tags?  Alright, alright.  I’ll shut up and show you what I’ve done.

Here they are.

Tag #1

Tag #1

Tag #2

Tag #2

Tag #3

Tag #3

Tag #4

Tag #4

Tag #5

Tag #5

Tag #6

Tag #6

Tag #7

Tag #7

Tag #8

Tag #8

This is all that remains of the sticker sheet.

 

The sticker sheet after

The sticker sheet after

I even made the buttons 😀  I used a 1 inch circle punch and a 3/4 inch circle punch.

 

1 inch circle punch

1 inch circle punch

3/4 inch circle punch

3/4 inch circle punch

Button stickers

Button stickers

Not bad for about four hours work.  Any fun distraction is always helpful after I have finished my daily business paperwork mess :/  I’m nearly finished with July.  Woo Hoo.

Leslie

 

Previous Older Entries