The definition of Insanity is…..

DOING THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER EXPECTING DIFFERENT RESULTS!

After having been successful in making the file folder box I figured it would be a snap to reduce the size to make a box to hold greeting cards and a smaller box to hold index cards for the way too many Internet sites and passwords I have and can’t seem to remember.

Two attempts were made to create a box that measures 6-3/8 inches wide by 4-3/4 inches tall and 1-1/2 inches deep, with a flap.

Two attempts to make the same box

Two attempts to make the same box

I gave up on the greeting card boxes because they were just way too wonky and I didn’t like the way they were coming together.

The next box I began was for an even smaller version of these two boxes.  Yep.  If you can’t figure out how to make something one size it is always worth while to go SMALLER :/

What the heck was I thinking?!

Smaller box

Smaller box

These boxes made from cardboard are quite thick.  They are very sturdy and can be used for heavy objects.  The only problem is they are too thick, clumsy, and labor intensive.  Mass producing these boxes would take quite a lot of time.

To decrease the bulk of the boxes I decided to give chipboard a try.  One 8-1/2 x 11 inch piece of chipboard will ALMOST make the greeting card box.  I had to get into my scrap pile for the extra chipboard for the lid and the flap.

You can see the measurements I have made on the chipboard….just in case you wish to make one of the greeting card boxes.

 

Measurements on sheet of chipboard

Measurements on sheet of chipboard

Measurements on scrap of chipboard

Measurements on scrap of chipboard

This is the order you would lay the pieces on the paper you choose to cover with.

Layout of pieces

Layout of pieces

This layout is too long for  a 12 x 12 sheet of scrapbook paper.  I had to use a bit of a matching paper for the lid and the flap.  That was a bug a boo to figure out  how to attach.

 

Attaching the lid and flap

Attaching the lid and flap

NOTE TO SELF:  Next time choose a paper with one design element featuring smaller images.

 

Attaching the lid and flap extension

Attaching the lid and flap extension

This is how the pieces will be laid out on the paper you choose.

Laid out on paper

Laid out on paper

When this box is finished it will hold 10 greeting cards with envelopes.

Holds 10 cards with envelopes

Holds 10 cards with envelopes

Magnets - they will be the death of me

Magnets – they will be the death of me

The extension

The extension

After battling the greeting card box, and having a little more success….I’m still not totally thrilled with how it has come out.  Especially the flippin’ MAGNETS!  I decided to turn my focus to the smaller box for the Internet passwords.

This box will use a half sheet of 8-1/2 x 11 chipboard.  The measurements are shown below.  Please note the change to three of the measurements.  Don’t ask me where my head was during this process.  I don’t have a clue what I was thinking.

Measurements on chipboard

Measurements on chipboard

Lay the pieces out on the decorative paper of your choice in this layout.  When attaching the chipboard to the paper I moved it over to the right edge and in 3/4 of an inch.

 

Laid out on paper

Laid out on paper

When completed, this box has thinner edges than the cardboard, which I was happier with.  The box itself was more square and less wonky.

 

Cardboard and chipboard comparison

Cardboard and chipboard comparison

The index cards for the Internet site and password file are 2-1/2 inches by 3 inches.  I found these at my local office supply store.

Index cards

Index cards

I will not be doing a full fledged tutorial on the construction of these boxes UNTIL I get the blasted things figured out.  I don’t like the side flaps showing on the front of the box.  Might as well have a “Mickey Mouse” image on this box.

Box with index cards

Box with index cards

Yes, and you can totally forget about the addition of any MAGNETS to close the box with.  I think I will be going back to my old friend – Velcro.  Velcro loves me and I love it back.

Here is a sample of how to use the index cards for the passwords.

 

Index card ready for info

Index card ready for info

I think I’m going to find something mindless to do for the next few hours.  My brain hurts :/

Go, “Show someone how special they are”.

Leslie

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Making a File Box – Part 3

Today, we are going to be putting the box together.  Seriously, this is simple to do.  The one thing I can tell you that is an absolute MUST is to have smooth cuts on your cardboard.  The pieces fit better when there are no wavy cuts or jagged edges bunging up the works.

File folder box

File folder box

Transform that box, in the photo above, into this box by following the steps below for the construction.

Finished file box

Finished file box

 

First thing to do is prep your work surface.  Whether you use liquid glue or a dry adhesive, such as Scor-Tape, you will need to have a containment area to keep all the gooey stuff from getting all over your table.  Personally, I like to use Freezer Paper.

Freezer paper

Freezer paper

Freezer paper has a slick side and a paper side.  The slick side will be UP, facing you.  Spread it out on your work surface and tape it down with some painters tape.

Use painters tape to hold the paper down

Use painters tape to hold the paper down

Get your supply of “structure strips” ready.  The adhesive you use is a personal choice.  Liquid adhesive or dry adhesive.  Doesn’t matter, they both accomplish the same objective…getting the strips to attach to the cardboard.  I prefer liquid glue.  Squirt some on, spread it around, then attach to the cardboard.  I’m all for saving time and being efficient.

Having to pull out a length of the dry adhesive, make sure it gets attached in the correct place, fussing with it and using a bone folder to make sure of good adhesion to the strip, then dealing with the paper covers.  Pulling the paper off the glue strip, containing the growing piles, chasing them on the floor because I missed the trash bag.  Then having no “Forgiveness” in the process.  When the dry adhesive gets attached it is there forever.  Liquid glue I can move the piece about to get it positioned right.

Round up your supplies

Round up your supplies

Fold one of the strips at the score line you had made and apply your adhesive….or apply your dry adhesive then fold on the score mark.  Smear out the liquid glue with a sponge brush then attach the strip to the bottom edge of the FILE BOX BACK piece.  That will be one of the 12 inch by 10 inch pieces.  Make sure you don’t put the folded area at the edge of your box piece.  Leave a small gap with the fold line showing.

Apply

Apply glue

It is vital that you get the adhesive out to the very edges of the strip.  Leaving a long worm of glue and calling it good is NOT good

Smear

Smear

Attach

Attach

Apply pressure and rub on the cardboard to fully engage the glued strip to the cardboard.  Turn the cardboard over and apply pressure along the length of the glued strip to ensure full adhesion.

Press firmly, front and back, for proper adhesion

Press firmly, front and back, for proper adhesion

If you need to add a bit of strip to a shorter length it is easy as cutting a piece to the length needed then glue it on, or if there is excess strip hanging off one side then snip it away.

Locate your BOTTOM piece.  This will be one of the 3 inch by 12 inch pieces.  Run glue the length of the exposed strip (or peel off the backing from the dry adhesive).  Smear the glue to the edges.  Butt the cardboard pieces together and raise the strip to be attached to the bottom piece.  Firmly rub the glued strip to get it adhered well.

Locate the box bottom piece

Locate the box bottom piece

Apply glue

Apply glue

Smear glue

Smear glue

Butt the two pieces together

Butt the two pieces together

Apply pressure to the strip for good adhesion

Apply pressure to the strip for good adhesion

It will look like this when properly glued together.

Two pieces attached

Two pieces attached

Get another structure strip and apply adhesive to one half of the strip.  If using liquid glue, smear the glue to the edges.  Attach the glued side of the strip to the side of your back piece.  We will be building the side in this step.

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Attach strip to one side of the box

Attach strip to one side of the box

Locate your next piece of cardboard.  One that measures 3 inches by 10 inches.  Apply glue to the strip and butt the side piece to the back piece.

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Attach the side piece

Attach the side piece

Cut away any excess strip that overhangs.  Measure and cut a piece of structure strip that will go on the bottom and side corner.  Apply adhesive, attach the strip to the corner of the side and bottom.

Cut a piece of strip to fit on the corner

Cut a piece of strip to fit on the corner

Apply adhesive to the entire strip

Apply adhesive to the entire strip

Press firmly at this joint to assure good adhesion.  Snip away any overhang of the strip.

Attach to the corner and press firmly

Attach to the corner and press firmly

Next you will further reinforce the seams of this box by doing the following.  Get a length of structure strip and apply adhesive to the entire strip.  Make sure the creased fold is facing you.  The “Mountain” fold will be up.  Work the folded strip into the joint of the back and side pieces of the box.  Press firmly all along the strip to ensure proper adhesion.  Set the box on its side and press the strip fully.

Apply adhesive fully to the strip

Apply adhesive fully to the strip

Press the strip firmly into the joint

Press the strip firmly into the joint

Place the box on its side and apply pressure to the strip

Place the box on its side an apply pressure to the strip

You will also need to reinforce the corner where the bottom and sides meet.  Do the same as above.  Apply glue to the strip, MOUNTAIN side, press the strip into the joint and apply pressure to adhere the strip firmly.

Measure a corner piece and adhere

Measure a corner piece and adhere

Following the steps above, get your other 3 inch by 10 inch piece and adhere it to the other side of the back and bottom piece.

Attach the other side piece

Attach the other side piece

Next, we will work on the FRONT of the box.  Locate your last 10 inch by 12 inch piece.  I am going to cut a curve at the top of this piece.

Locate the other 10 inch by 12 inch piece

Locate the other 10 inch by 12 inch piece

Find the center along the 12 inch width.  I am using a thing I don’t know what it is EXCEPT it has  a curve.  I have lined up the center mark of the curve tool with the center mark on the cardboard and traced around the tool.

Find the center along the 12 inch piece

Find the center along the 12 inch length

With a craft mat under my cardboard piece, I have used a craft tool to cut on the pencil line.

Use a craft knife to cut on the pencil line

Use a craft knife to cut on the pencil line

Cut the curve away

Cut the curve away

The front of the box will look like this.

Front of box

Front of box

Back to the structure strip business to attach the front to the box.  Apply adhesive to both sides of the strip.  Making sure the adhesive goes all the way out to the edges.

Apply adhesive to the strip

Apply adhesive to the strip

Attach the strip to the box front and side corner

Attach the strip to the box front and side corner

Do the same to the other side of the box.  Make sure the edges butt up against each other as you apply the strip.

Attach the other side and front

Attach the other side and front

Look at this.  So far this is going along smoothly and is very easy to create the box.  Keep going….you are over half way finished.

Looking like a box

Looking like a box

The last part of the outside is to adhere a strip to the box bottom and front to close this up.

Last outside piece to attach

Last outside piece to attach

By now, you should have a good handle on how to use the structure strips.  The last thing to do is reinforce the inside of the box.  MOUNTAIN folds on this part.  Get the folded ridge pushed into the joints all over the inside of the box.

Reinforce the inside joints

Reinforce the inside joints

You can stop here if you don’t want to have a lid on your box.  The rest of this is how to put a lid and flap on, covering the edges, and making a cover for the curved edge.

If moving on to the lid.  Locate your last 3 inch by 12 inch piece.  Place it on top of the box opening.  If you were careful in your placement of the structure strips your box will be even and flush.  If you have a wonky box you will need to make adjustments to it now.  That will involve slitting the structure strips where the problem lies, moving the box to square, then reapplying structure strips.

Using the structure strips, attach the box lid to the BACK of the box.  Then attach the FLAP to the TOP FRONT OF THE BOX.  Doing this will make the next steps easier to handle.  You will be making a “Ditch” for the proper working of the lid and flap.

Check the fit of the lid

Check the fit of the lid

Working on the INSIDE of the lid piece.  You will need to take your structure strip to the score board and make another score 1/8 inch to the left of the center score.  You will have a “U” shape for this strip.  This is necessary.

Score 1/8 inch to left of center

Score 1/8 inch to left of center

Apply adhesive to the "U" shape

Apply adhesive to the “U” shape

Holding the lid in place, press the “U” into the joint of the lid and the top of the box.  You will need this extra bit of spacing to make the lid work properly.

Press the "U" into the joint of the lid and the top

Press the “U” into the joint of the lid and the top

Locate your final piece, the 2 inch by 12 inch piece.  Get another structure strip and score 1/8 inch to the left of center and apply the glued strip to the joint of the flap and the lid.  Make sure to apply pressure to strip on both of these pieces.

Locate the 2 inch by 12 inch piece

Locate the 2 inch by 12 inch piece

Seat the "U" into the joint of the top and flap

Seat the “U” into the joint of the top and flap

Work the flap  up and down to make sure it is secure

Work the flap up and down to make sure it is secure

Your lid and flap should be working well.  The lid will not close fully at this point.  When you cover the box, or paint it, the lid and flap will be secured with a magnet or Velcro.

Apply structure strips to the outside joints

Apply structure strips to the outside joints

Now all that is left is to cover up the raw edges of the box and lid.  Gather your structure strips and take them to the score board.  Score 1/8 inch to the left of center on a whole bunch of them.  Measure and cut a piece of strip to fit one of the side edges.  Apply adhesive and adhere the strip to the box raw edge.

Score the structure strips 1/8 inch to the left of center

Score the structure strips 1/8 inch to the left of center

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Attach to raw edge

Attach to raw edge

Continue covering your raw edges of the flap and the other side of the box.  We will deal with the curve in a moment.

Cover all the raw edges

Cover all the raw edges

Now for the curve.  Start with a long length of structure strip, crease it fully on the fold lines.  Place the strip over the front raw edge.  Note where the curve of the front begins.  Make a snip in the strip.  End the snip CLOSE TO the fold line.  NOT INTO THE FOLD.

Make snips along the length of the strip as you follow the curve.

Snip TO the crease where the curve begins

Snip TO the crease where the curve begins

Make corresponding snips on the back side of the strip.  Remember to NOT snip into the crease mark.

Make corresponding snips to the back of the strip

Make corresponding snips to the back of the strip

Test fit the snipped strip.  Add any additional snips where necessary.

Test fit the snipped strip

Test fit the snipped strip

Make more snips if necessary

Make more snips if necessary

When satisfied then this is done

When satisfied then this is done

Liberally apply adhesive to the snipped strip then attach to the box front raw edge.

Apply adhesive

Apply adhesive

Install strip

Install strip

Apply the last bit of strip to finish off the raw edges.  Let this box set for about 24 hours for the adhesive to cure.  Even the dry adhesive needs a cure time.  You can think about what you want to do about covering the box while the adhesive cures.

I seriously  hope this tutorial has been clear and concise in my instruction and the accompanying photos.  I also hope that I have given you the confidence to give box building a try.

Are you ready to go and “Show someone how special they are”?

Leslie

What’s all the “Flap” about?!

Today, I am going to show you how to make a mini album page become sort of interactive.  Well, it will “flap”.  No not flop!  Flap.  Three 4 x 6 photos cut down to 5-1/4 x 3-3/4 and double matted to 5-3/4 by 4-1/4.

Mini album page closed

Mini album page closed

Mini album page open

Mini album page open

A binder clip with the cute tag is used to hold the flaps closed.  I used a bit of 1/8 inch Scor-Tape on the tag where the binder clip meets the tag to secure the clip in place.  The tag is now glued to the binder clip….not the photo.

Binder clip to hold flaps closed

Binder clip to hold flaps closed

First things first.  Mount your photos on mats if  you are going to do that.  Next you will cut 2 to 3 one inch strips of card stock in your color choice.  I have chosen black.  These strips are 1 inch x 11 inches.  Next you will score the strips at 1/2 inch the entire length of the strips.

Cut 1 inch strips of card stock

Cut 1 inch strips of card stock

Score each strip at 1/2 inch

Score each strip at 1/2 inch

Next, decide the placement of your photos on the page.  Choose the one that will go on the bottom and in the center of the page, close to the binding edge.

Choose the bottom photo

Choose the bottom photo

Next, choose the photo that will be on the lower end of the page and atop the first photo.  I’ve chosen to put it on an angle.  Make sure you have left enough room at the bottom edge of the photo to not be on top of the bottom photo.  Confusing?  Stick with me here.

Choose the photo that will be next

Choose the photo that will be next

The last photo on my layout will be the top photo.  If you are doing three as well, align the top photo so that the top edge does not end up on the bottom photo or the one in the middle.  This is important for the “flapping” to happen.

Choose your top photo

Choose your top photo

Once you have them all placed the way you want them….you might want to take a quick photo of it to remind yourself where they all will go when it comes time to mount them.  Now take all of them off the page.

Get one of the structure strips.  Measure and cut it to the length required to fit the right edge of the photo.  Once cut, apply a dry adhesive to both halves of the strip.  On the same side.  You will cry, stomp, and fling things if you put adhesive on the fold.  So don’t put adhesive on the fold!

Cut structure strip to the length needed

Cut structure strip to the length needed

Apply adhesive to both halves of the structure strip

Apply adhesive to both halves of the structure strip

Peel away ONE side only of the dry adhesive protective paper.  Only one side now.

Remove backing from one side only

Remove backing from one side only

Carefully place the sticky structure strip on the photo back.  Line up the fold with the edge of the photo and adhere the structure strip to the back of the photo.

Line up the fold with the edge of the photo and adhere

Line up the fold with the edge of the photo and adhere

If you did it right it will look like this.  I’m not going to tell you how many times I messed up.  Just know that you can mess up if you are not paying attention.  Get some coffee or some caffeine in you :/

It will look like this

It will look like this

Remove the protective cover from the adhesive on the “flap” tab.  Adhere the photo in the area you have chosen for it to live.  Press firmly along the photo edge to adhere the glue.  Then test the flap to make sure it is not stuck or going to cause a problem.  Don’t ask :/

Remove the protective strips

Remove the protective strips

Adhere your photo in place

Adhere you photo in place

Test that the flap works

Test that the flap works

Now, if you had success with the first flap installation….the other two will be a piece of cake!

Same as the first flapping photo.  Add dry adhesive to both halves of the strip you measured and cut to fit the bottom of the photo.

Add adhesive to the strip

Add adhesive to the strip

Place your photo in the area you chose.  Make sure the flap tab is not on the photo below.

Adhere you photo

Adhere your photo

Test it to make sure it functions well.

Test to make sure it works

Test to make sure it works

The third, and final, photo on this layout will be done the same.  The flap tab will go on the top of the photo and adhered on the page over the second photo.  This will keep the bottom photo from opening up and getting mangled.

Add adhesive to the strip for the top photo

Add adhesive to the strip for the top photo

Adhere the photo to the page

Adhere the photo to the page

I have chosen an Anonymous quote to be placed in the center of this page under all of the photos.  Kind of a little surprise when my granddaughter opens this page.

 

A little hidden surprise

A little hidden surprise

I will be making journal spots for these three photos.  I will not mount them.  I’ll let my granddaughter write what she wants to on them and attach them herself.

Last thing to do is to create a decorative closure to hold the “flaps” closed.

Binder clip to hold flaps closed

Binder clip to hold flaps closed

This was fun to construct.  Even though I had a few problems at the start it was still fun.  Hope you have been inspired to give this a try.

Now…..go “Show someone how special they are”.

Leslie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to create a hidden pocket in a mini album.

Do you find the pieces you are using on a mini album page have taken up all the available space?  Did you not leave yourself enough room for a journal tag or spot?  Are you saying “Crapazoid!” about now?  Stick with me and I’ll show you how to make a  hidden pocket on a layout.

No place for journaling.

No place for journaling.

In the photo above you see that I have used the entire page element.  Look closer and you see the end of a tag sticking out on the lower right.  Here is where the tag will live.

Hidden pocket

Hidden pocket

Before I get into the construction of the hidden pocket I want to show you one of the things I found in my room when I did my organization.  Stampin’ Up! rub ons.  I found four sets of these.  Some of them have been used while the remainder have not even had the seal broken on them.  Bonus find!  I’m pretty sure this set is no longer available.  Check with your demonstrator, or look at the site online to see if they still make rub ons.

Stampin' Up! rub ons

Stampin’ Up! rub ons

Okay, now to the reason for this post.  If you remember back a few months….maybe October….I made some cardboard boxes to store some stuff in.  In the construction of my boxes I made use of structure strips to give the box strength.

Cleaning off my work table I found several piles of left over structure strips.

Structure strip scraps

Structure strip scraps

The structure strips are created using craft card stock cut to 1 inch lengths and scored at 1/2 inch down the center.  To turn this structure strips into what I will need them for I put them on my score board and made another score line 1/8 inch to the left of the center score.  Clear as mud?

Scoring to the left 1/8 inch

Scoring to the left 1/8 inch

This will create a “channel” for the hidden pocket.  I needed to create three of these.

Creating a channel

Creating a channel

Once finished with the scoring and folding I cut one end off at an angle.  Measured the length I would need on the back side of my photo and cut the other end at an angle as well.

 

Cut the end at an angle

Cut the end at an angle

Measure, cut, and test to fit

Measure, cut, and test to fit

Using adhesive of your choice, put it on the NARROWEST side of the structure strip.  Then attach the piece to the back of your photo mat.

Add adhesive to the narrow end

Add adhesive to the narrow end

Attach the strip to the back of our photo mat

Attach the strip to the back of your photo mat

Do this same thing to the other two pieces of structure strips.  When finished you will have the beginnings of your pocket.

Add adhesive to the other strips and place on mat

Add adhesive to the other strips and place on mat

Your pocket is coming together

Your pocket is coming together

Add adhesive to the outside flaps of these channels.  If using a liquid glue I would recommend you do this step one at a time.  Add glue to the smallest piece.  Or peel off the protective paper if using dry adhesive.

Apply adhesive to the three channels

Apply adhesive to the three channels

Place this first tab in the desired location of your layout and press it firmly to seat the adhesive.  If using liquid glue you will do the same at this point.

Attach the tab in the desired location

Attach the tab in the desired location

If using liquid glue, at this time put it on the two long tabs.  If using dry adhesive pull the protective covers off.  Carefully place the pocket in the desired location.  Make sure you have a “box” shape happening.

Peel off the protective covers and place on layout

Peel off the protective covers and place on layout

You will now have a box

You will now have a box

Using a bone folder, get inside the box and press down all three tabs to make sure you have good adhesion.

Use a bone folder to press down the tabs

Use a bone folder to press down the tabs

There you have it.  A hidden pocket on an otherwise full layout.

On a different note entirely.  I have been making blog posts ahead of time using a totally awesome Blog Post Planner created by Productive Flourishing.  This form has been a life saver to me.

Blog Post Planner

Blog Post Planner

I used it to bore you to tears with my craft room organization.  It took two days to clean up that mess but I stretched it out for the week so that you wouldn’t miss anything in my insanity.

Organization posts

Organization posts

Now that I’m making this mini album for my granddaughter and trying to use it as a tutorial I have split up the posts into easy to follow tips and ideas.  You can see how I kept track of the sequence of making the mini album.

Blog schedule for mini album

Blog schedule for mini album

If you are new to blogging and feel you have a lot to say, or would like to say, this is a good place to get your thoughts in order and give you a starting point in making your blog less intimidating.

Tomorrow’s post I’m going to show you how I made the Maya Road chipboard gears look metallic.  I did it with embossing powders.

Heat embossed chipboard gears

Heat embossed chipboard gears

Time to let “Someone know how special they are”.

Leslie

 

 

 

Abracadabra and Hocus Pocus. The magic of paint and paper. More illusions :D

Do you remember the second box I made last week?  The one that I tore stuff off?  Here is a reminder if you don’t remember.

Box #2

Box #2

I only added a couple of “structure strips” to the places that had been damaged by my ripping stuff off.

Added structure strips to areas torn away.

Added structure strips to areas torn away.

More black acrylic paint was slathered over the box edges, inside and out, of both the box and the lid.

Black acrylic paint spread around the outside and inside of box and lid

Black acrylic paint spread around the outside and inside of box and lid

I’m using the DCWV Mariposa paper collection again.

DCWV Mariposa paper collection

DCWV Mariposa paper collection

These two sheets will be the outside of the box.

Papers for outside of the box

Papers for outside of the box

Papers for inside the box.

Papers for inside the box

Papers for inside the box

CRAPAZOID!!!!  I missed a whole section of the inside of the box with the black acrylic paint :/

What the heck was I doing?

What the heck was I doing?

Using another sheet of paper from the DCWV Mariposa papers I covered the outside of the lid.

DCWV Mariposa paper for the lid

DCWV Mariposa paper for the lid

These papers are supposed to be all coordinating and used together or independently.  I’m not 100% sure I like this color scheme but I’m going to just live with it.  I really like the paper on the lid.

Pretty lid :D

Pretty lid 😀

I’ve used this paper on other projects over the past four or five years.  My supply is dwindling away to the point I’m not sure what Box #3 is going to look like :/  The plastic packing I’ve saved for use with die cutting fits in this box very well.

Plastic packaging to be used in die cutting.

Plastic packaging to be used in die cutting

I’ve made a label for the front of this box.  So I know what is in there.  Moving my stash around every year over the winter…when I get back home from my truck driving I can’t remember where I put stuff.  Hopefully….HOPEFULLY!!!!!…..that is done – finished – retired – and I will be home all this coming year.

I have a Stampin’ Up! products called “Hodgepodge Hardware”.  I don’t think this product is sold any longer.  I’ve had this for about five years and it doesn’t get used.

Stampin' Up! Hodgepodge Hardware

Stampin’ Up! Hodgepodge Hardware

There are all sorts of goodies in this box.

 

Lots of shiny stuff :D

Lots of shiny stuff 😀

I’ve chosen the largest label thing-a-ma-bob for this box.  I used another one for the card box I made and I’ll show you that one at the end of this post.

I drew around the metal piece on the back side of one of the Mariposa paper scraps and cut around it.

Draw around the hardware piece

Draw around the hardware piece

Cut inside the pencil lines

Cut inside the pencil lines

Using another scrap of the Mariposa paper I covered a piece of chipboard about 1/2 inch larger than the hardware piece.

Cover a piece of chipboard with scrap paper

Cover a piece of chipboard with scrap paper

Backside of the chipboard

Backside of the chipboard

Mark where the holes will be punched.

Mark where the holes are to be punched

Mark where the holes are to be punched

I printed a label from my DYMO LabelWriter to be a centered on the label piece.

DYMO label

DYMO label

Adhere to label piece

Adhere to label piece

Now I can attach this label to the box with hot glue.

Label complete

Label complete

Now I have two (2) boxes complete 😀  I’m pretty happy with how they have turned out.

Two completed boxes

Two completed boxes

I like the brown with the pink better now.

Box complete

Box complete

So, there you have it.  A pretty box that had been damaged.  You don’t even know where the under side had been torn and ripped.  Abracadabra and Hocus Pocus!  It’s magic 😀

If there is anyone that would be interested in a video tutorial on making these storage boxes from scratch please let me know.  If there is enough interest I will do it.

Leslie

The untold story of perfect art projects.

For new art creators, newby crafters, the inspiring YouTube videos speak to your creative soul.  You watch several videos and get so stoked.  Totally excited to take on the world and show the people in your life just exactly how totally AWESOME you are.  Some of the videos come with Step-By-Step tutorials to break down the process.  Other videos show you the finished product then explain the tools and products they used.

I am not a “newby crafter” but I am not a “seasoned crafter” either.  Believe me…I get just as frustrated as you do when my creations FAIL.  I have had some epic failures.

I’ve been watching some YouTube videos on creating storage boxes from chipboard.  The person I like to watch is “ozegran“.  Her videos are very inspiring…to me anyway.  I have a mechanical bent to my personality.  I get so excited when I see someone make useful products out of plain old stuff.  This woman is from Australia, I think that is where the “OZE” part comes from.  Get it Aussi….OZE?

I don’t have ready access to large sheets of chipboard but I do have access to corrugated cardboard.  I purchase sheets of corrugated cardboard from my local Budget Box and Bag store.

Corrugated cardboard sheets.

Corrugated cardboard sheets.

Jim, The Gentleman Crafter, has a video on making “Structure Strips“.  Spending time watching these two crafters I knew I could make a box to store the greeting cards I have made.  Now they sit on my table and are in danger of getting damaged.

Piles of cards

Piles of cards.

Cards jammed into a container

Cards jammed into a container

The last two weeks I was out on the road doing my “Day Job” I had plenty of time to think about building a box to store my cards in.  I got so excited!!!  I could picture the finished box in my head.  Covered with bright fabric.  The edges would have piping on them to make the box look like no other box out there.

Monday I went to Michaels and purchased some chipboard.  Tuesday I got myself into my craft room and began creating the box I had in my head.

Beautiful, isn’t it?!

Fabric covered storage box

Fabric covered storage box

There are some problems with this box.  First problem is the fish.  They are UPSIDE DOWN on the box.  They are Right Side UP on the inside of the box :/

 

Inside of fabric covered box.

Inside of fabric covered box.

The next problem is….the box is TOO BIG for my greeting cards :/

Box too big for greeting cards

Box too big for greeting cards

The lid.  That is another story.  I wanted to make a “Hinged” lid.  I have some really wide taffeta ribbon. That would be perfect for the supporting hinge.  Trouble is….I couldn’t figure out how to attach it :/

Ribbon hinge.

Ribbon hinge.

Crapazoid.  Don't know how to attach it.

Crapazoid. Don’t know how to attach it.

All is not lost.  I can use this box to store my embossing folders in.  It is just the right width and  height for these specialty tools 😀

 

Trying out the embossing folders.

Trying out the embossing folders.

YES!  They fit!

YES! They fit!

I created a second box that would be just the right size for my cards.  This time I was going to get the fish fabric to be right side up.  I cut only the front and back panels to test my theory out.  Well….that went all pear shaped :/  And the lid….that was a catastrophe.

Box #2

Box #2

The lid was too big.

The lid was too big.

The cards FIT!  Yippee Skippy!

The cards FIT! Yippee Skippy!

Having the cards fit in the box was a major WOO HOO for me.  Success!  I was totally stoked.  I cut panels of the fish fabric to fit on the front and back end of the box.

Fabric panels cut to fit.

Fabric panels cut to fit.

I cut strips of upholstery piping to be attached on the edges and bottom of the box.

Upholstery piping for a pop of color.

Upholstery piping for a pop of color.

I glued the fabric on wonky and the piping only pointed to the wonky fabric.

Crapazoid the box shows through.

Crapazoid the box shows through.

So I tore it all off.

Tear it all off.

Tear it all off.

I did make a lid that would fit 😀  So now I have to fix the torn cardboard and do something else to this box.  I think those plastic packages the embossing folders came in would fit in this poor box.  YES!  They do fit.

Plastic packaging to be used later.

Plastic packaging to be used later.

And the lid fits snugly on the box.  Woo Hoo!

The new lid fits perfect.

The new lid fits perfect.

So now I have a serious mess in my craft room.

One serious mess is happening here.

One serious mess is happening here.

Box #1 took over 8  hours to build.  Because I didn’t know what I was doing.  Box #3 took 4  hours to create.  Lid included.

Box #3

Box #3

The lid looks so good and I am thrilled with the whole box.

Box and Lid #3

Box and Lid #3

Just look at this awesomeness 😀  I won’t be putting the fabric on this box.  THAT IS FOR SURE!

Perfection!

Perfection!

So, in conclusion, this message is for new crafters….and not so new crafters.  When you begin a project that you have never done before be prepared for the “Learning Curve”.

DON’T STOP BECAUSE THE FIRST ATTEMPT FAILED.

Learn from your mistakes.  Make the necessary adjustments.  Keep at it.  Your head will be full of condescending voices that will tell you how much you stink at this.  There will be soul crushing crap running full tilt in your head.

  • See.  I knew you couldn’t do it!
  • Now look at all the stuff you have wasted!
  • You don’t know what you are doing!
  • Just leave it alone.  You’ll never figure it out.
  • Just look at that junk you have made.
  • Other people can do this better.
  • Leave this “pro-ject” to someone that knows what they are doing!
  • Seriously.  You have wasted time that could have been better spent on washing dishes!

DON’T LISTEN TO THE VOICES IN YOUR HEAD!!!!!

It took me three tries to make the box correctly.  The two “Failures” are going to work just fine for me in my craft room.

AND BEST OF ALL!!!!!  I MADE THEM.  ALL BY MYSELF!!!!!!

Take that you dirty birds!  Stick it up your nose with a rubber hose you rotten voices!

Now….I have to figure out how to decorate my PERFECT box :/