IKEA Moppe Collection and Pantone Color of the Year

I have just about got everything put back into my room.  In order and organized.  I have done a lot of purging.  I have a pile of stuff that I will be giving away either on my YouTube channel or here on my blog.  Once I get that mess sorted into something more than a pile that is threatening to become an avalanche, that is.

My room needs some color…other than stark white.  I have a set of wooden drawers from IKEA.  When I bought these….in about 2003….they went by a different name.  Today they are called MOPPE.  These cubes are unfinished wood.  Check out Pinterest to get some ideas for your storage needs.

I am using the Pantone Color of the Year.  I am choosing the papers to cover the drawer fronts from the “Grand Canyon” collection.  Deep earthy tones ranging from rich browns, deep purples, blue gray, dark peach, and greens.  I can do this from my recliner.

As you can see, by the photo below, prints don’t matter in this case.  Just use the color range if you have the vast array of paper scraps as I have.  Good Lord!

IKEA Moppe collection

IKEA Moppe collection

Hey, look a bit further down on the wooden drawer fronts and you will see that I had made an attempt to cover the drawer fronts years ago.  The great thing about this IKEA set of drawers….there is another side of the drawer if you don’t like what you have done.  Just like our paper when rubber stamping.  Make an “Oopsy”, flip the paper over and try again.  😀

I’m using papers that I have on hand in my various scrap paper bins.  The purple drawer, you see in the photo below, is using a 12 x 12 piece of Halloween paper I’ve had for a number of years.  One side has glitter and the side I chose has circles.  I had to piece the paper together to get it long enough.  These wide drawers are more than 12 inches.

Purple and green on the first set of cubes

Purple and green on the first set of cubes

I’m using a mix of text weight paper and card stock.  Whatever has the color I want to use and that will fit.

I keep the Pantone colors open on my iPhone as I go about the color selection.  The actual colors from the site and the papers I have in my stash don’t necessarily match each other.  I am using it as a guide to introduce me to being bolder in my paper choices.  Meh, failure just means I’ve learned something.  And I do have the other side LOL.

Pantone site on iPhone

Pantone site on iPhone

Once you choose the paper for your drawer front, check it for fit.  I hold it as firmly as I possibly can.  Press along the edges of the drawer front then use a pencil to draw along the drawer.  Include the finger notch.  Then cut along the inside of the pencil lines.

Fit the paper and press along the edges

Fit the paper and press along the edges

Using a pencil, draw around the drawer front, including the finger notch

Using a pencil, draw around the drawer front, including the finger notch.

Apply glue of your choice to the drawer front then smooth out.  Check to make sure you don’t have any voids or dry areas.  Especially along the edges.

Add glue of your choice

Add glue of your choice

Smooth it out and check for voids

Smooth it out and check for voids

Apply your paper and press well to adhere.  Use a brayer or a credit card to get out air bubbles and seat the paper well into the glue.

Apply paper to the glued surface

Apply paper to the glued surface

Use a brayer or a credit card to work out air bubbles

Use a brayer or a credit card to work out air bubbles

My radiation treatments begin today.  This afternoon I will start a five to seven week regimen which will be Monday through Friday.  Wonder if I will glow in the dark by the time it is over.

Never fear, I will be back to making video tutorials.  Hopefully next week.  This week I will finish editing the videos I have made for the wonderful and loving gifts I have received.  Watch for those.

Leslie

Let’s do some Punching!

If you have an electronic cutter with shapes similar to what I have in punches you can use them.  Or even if you have a selection of nested dies you can do this.  Paw through your assortment of tools to see what you come up with.

My punch collection is from my days as a Stampin’ Up! Demonstrator.   Most all of them are no longer available (maybe on eBay).  I am using what I have on hand.

The inspiration for this current state of affairs is from watching quite a number of DIY Embellishment videos on YouTube.  You will find these at the end of this post.

As you can, plainly, see….I have one or two punches in my collection *eye roll*.

My collection of punches

My collection of punches

I have a plastic holder full of various shapes of craft paper….card stock and printed papers….that have been stashed out of sight until I was ready to tackle the task of cutting them into usable sizes for card fronts.  These papers are, instead, going to be mauled by my punches.

Collection of scrap paper

Collection of scrap paper

I have amassed quite a new collection of paper items that I have no storage space for.  Yay ME!  *groan*

Piles of punched items

Piles of punched items

Using some of the, CAN YOU BELIEVE IT, 500 coin envelopes I bought several years ago because I could not purchase less than that.  I have put each type of punch item in its own coin envelope.  I have selected an assortment of four (4) punch elements and roughly layered them together.  Attempting to figure out color combinations that work together.

My attempt at color coordination

My attempt at color coordination

These four (4) punches from Stampin’ Up! were used for this endeavor.  And you can see how I layered them together to create an embellishment for a card front.

My assortment of DIY Embellishments

My assortment of DIY Embellishments

Here is a better view of my creations.  I have used Tim Holtz “Chit Chat” word stickers on most of these.  I’ve also used a stamped sentiment I recently purchased from a dear friend who sells for “A Stamper’s Journey”.

My creations

My creations

I will have a YouTube video up later today or possibly on Monday (July 4, 2016) showing what I have done to create these.  You can then do the same, or something similar, with your punches or electronic cutters.  Hey, give  yourself the chance to have the “Go To” pieces for  your mini albums, scrapbook layouts, greeting cards, and even your art journals.  You may even find your creations rival those of K&Co., Anna Griffith, or whomever you adore and spend precious money on.

As promised, here are the videos that inspired me to give this a try.

How to make chipboard mini album pages.

About two years ago I read a comment on a YouTube video, don’t remember which one it was though.   The viewer asked if there was anywhere to find out how to make a mini album from start to finish.  At first the question seemed strange.  Then I remembered how I felt when I first heard about mini albums and watched one video after another of finished products.  The same question banged about in my head.  How does one go about starting the whole process?

That viewer is probably now making some of those fantastic mini albums after having gone through the learning curve all by themselves.  I am going to create a series of blog posts all about creating a mini album.  From start to finish.  Since I am making one for my granddaughter’s birthday I figure now would be a good time to document the process.

There are many phases to creating a mini album.  There are many types of mini albums as well.  Paper bag minis which make use of the brown paper lunch bag.  Card stock mini albums that are made entirely of card stock and patterned papers.  The sizes range from 3 inches to 9 inches.  The “standard” seem to be having 6 to 8 pages in the album with a ton of pockets.  I deal with that feature in a later post.  Right now I want to just focus on how to begin.

This mini album will be for an 8 inch by 9 inch, three ring binder.  It will also feature chipboard as the page bases throughout.

STEP ONE:  You have to decide on the size of your mini album.  Then you have to decide what you will use as the base pages for the actual function of the mini album.

STEP TWO:  You  have to think about the “Sections” of your mini album. Are they all going to be the same?  A wedding theme?  A new baby?  A birthday?  A family reunion?  This type of mini album will not need to have dividers, or sections.

My granddaughter’s mini album will feature sections for friends, family, sports, and her precious self.  I want to take a “moment”, if you will, of her life and hold it for safe keeping for her.  Over the coming years she can look back and remember the fun she had with her friends, the soccer (football) games she played in, her quirky little brother, and what her life was like as a 15 year old young woman.

STEP THREE:  Choose the photos you want to use in the mini album.  You can check out my previous post about how I chose the photos.

STEP FOUR:  Gather your supplies.  I purchased some of the components for this mini album from a local scrapbook store.  Not from one of the major chains of crafting stores.

My supplies

My supplies

This mini album will be a notebook type.  I purchased a Bo Bunny 8 inch by 9 inch chipboard bound three ring binder that was empty.  Had no papers or plastic holders inside.  There was an assortment of books available that included the papers, plastic photo sleeves, and other decorative items.  I did not like what I saw for the paper choices and chose to make my own.

 

Bo Bunny 8 x 9 binder

Bo Bunny 8 x 9 binder

Now the process begins.  Get a scrap piece of paper that is long enough to fit the length of the binder you have chosen.

Scrap paper to make the ring  holes

Scrap paper to make the ring holes

As even as you can possibly get it, place the scrap piece of paper between the ring jaws and close them on the paper.  You will make an indentation on the scrap paper where the rings close.

Close the rings on the scrap paper

Close the rings on the scrap paper

Measure and draw a pencil line 1/2 inch from the edge of the scrap paper.  Find the ring binder indentations on the paper and mark their placement on this scrap.

Draw a line 1/2 inch from the paper edge

Draw a line 1/2 inch from the paper edge

Make a circle on the line where the binding closed

Make a circle on the line where the binding closed

Check to make sure these marked areas line up with the binder jaws.

Make sure the circles match the rings

Make sure the circles match the rings

Make any adjustments now.  It is necessary if you want the pages to fit properly.  When everything lines up punch the holes in the scrap paper guide.  Test your “guide” for fit and make any adjustments now.

Punch holes in the scrap paper guide

Punch holes in the scrap paper guide

For the chipboard pages of this album I will be using four (4) sheets of 8-1/2 by 11.  You can use cereal boxes cut to the size you need.  Have some lined paper pads?  Take the backer board from the paper pad and use it.

8-1/2 x 11 chipboard sheet

8-1/2 x 11 chipboard sheet

I am cutting the chipboard at 7-1/2 inches along the 11 inch length.

 

Measure 7-1/2 inches

Measure 7-1/2 inches

Using a craft knife cut the chipboard

Using a craft knife cut the chipboard

I will be using the “off cuts” in this mini album as pages, too.  I won’t be discarding the short pieces.

I want to have tabbed dividers in this album.  If you would like to as well, find something with a tab on it.  Notebook plastic tabbed dividers, chipboard dividers, recipe card dividers.  Whatever you wish to use as a template.

Find a template

Find a template

Line up your template to the starting tab placement you want to establish as the start.  Trace around your template with a pencil.  Take the next page and move the template over for the placement of the next tab.  Continue drawing and marking your template piece on your base pieces until you have completed this step.

Align the template to the first sheet

Align the template to the first sheet

Draw around the template

Draw around the template

Line up the second sheet and mark the placement

Line up the second sheet and mark the placemen

Do the same for the third

Do the same for the third

Continue until you have them all marked

Continue until you have them all marked

Using the craft knife and a metal edged ruler cut along your pencil marks on each of the tabbed divider sheets.

Using a craft knife cut along the pencil line

Using a craft knife cut along the pencil line

At the tabbed area cut on an angle

At the tabbed area cut on an angle

Your first tab is created

Your first tab is created

Continue the process until you have finished

Continue the process until you have finished

Using your “hole guide” line up the scrap piece with the bottom edge of your chipboard where you will make the holes.  Make sure the template is even along the bottom and one of the outer edges.  Mark the hole alignment with a pencil.  Cut out the holes and then test fit these pages in your binder.

Bring your hole template to the pages

Bring your hole template to the pages

Line the template along the bottom and one side

Line the template along the bottom and one side

Mark the hole placement

Mark the hole placement

Punch the holes

Punch the holes

Test fit the pages in your binder

Test fit the pages in your binder

That’s enough for today.  Tomorrow we will tackle the project of covering your chipboard with papers.

The easy part has just been finished.  I hope you will stick with me as I go along this journey into enlightenment 😀

 

Leslie

 

Serendipity Squares

Serendipity Squares

Serendipity Squares

Around 2005 I spent a few days surfing the internet looking for ways of sorting, storing, or using scraps from the papers I had in an ever growing pile.

In my quest, I found a website that inspired me to use some of the scraps.  Check out Go Make Something for ideas for ATC’s as well as the Serendipity Squares.

If you don’t have rubber stamps or embossing powders don’t put this idea off.  Gather up your bright colored scraps and glue them down all over the place.  Layer, layer, layer.

Personally, I don’t enjoy the first part of the journey because of the chaos of everything piled up, no clean lines, no definition of anything.  It is a mess.  A total gut wrenching mess – for me anyway.

Once you finish with your layers and cut that mess into squares is when you can get creative.  Look through your stash of hardware, ribbon, and bling.  These squares are so small that just one item or three small items is about all they can hold.

If you have made yourself a promise to not shop for more until you use up what you have, well bring your stash out and throw caution to the wind.  There are no rules in this treatment.  If you watch the video I’ve created to make these Serendipity Squares you will see that even though things don’t work out as you planned it all works out in the end.  That is the most important part of this process.

16 embellishments have been created from one 6″ x 6″ piece of paper.  Now THAT is a way to save some money.