Cheap Trick – Sliding Blade Trimmer.

Happy Thanksgiving to all in the US.  My wish for you is that you enjoy your family and friends on this special day.  Good family and friends, great food, and lots of love and laughter.

After you have risen from your nap after the bountiful foods and drink have a look at this video I have created.  I show you how to use a budget priced paper trimmer to cut a square hole in the center of two A4 size (4-1/4 x 5-1/2) pieces of card stock.  I show you how to get the scored frame around your cut.  I also show you how to use the paper trimmer to score lines along the length of the card stock.

You will see, in the video, that I make a 2 inch square cut out on the card stock pieces.  If you want a rectangle or larger square to feature one of your favorite stamped images or beautiful papers it will be easy for you to do.

Find the center, which I show you the center measurements in the video.  Measure your image or feature element.  Say for example you have a stamped image that is 1-1/2 inches wide by 3 inches tall.  Add 1/2 inch to the measurements to be 2 inches wide and 3-1/2 inches tall.  Your center line measurement will be 1 inch from the left of center and 1 inch from the right of center on the wide part.  For the tall measurement you would be 1-5/8 inches from the top of center and 1-5/8 inches from the bottom of center.

Mark you paper lightly with a pencil and then cut your “aperture” that will feature your stamped image.  There are so many variations you can make with this technique.  Cut out a diamond, square, or rectangle shape that will leave people asking how you did it. 😀

Have fun in your creativity.  Get to know your paper trimmer.  Most of all, if you are a beginning card maker and have limited tools, use what you have to create amazing things.

I hope you enjoyed this video and learned something from it.  I look forward to learning what you do.

Leslie

Sample #1 – Sliding Blade Trimmer

First, let us get acquainted with the Sliding Blade Trimmer.  You probably have one of these in your crafting space and are pretty familiar with it already.  For those that just use this tool along the horizontal measuring area at the top of the trimmer, you may  not realize there is also a VERTICAL measuring area on the swing arm.

Sliding Blade Trimmers

Sliding Blade Trimmers

Horizontal and Vertical measuring aids on trimmer

Horizontal and Vertical measuring aids on trimmer

Let’s take a look at the cutting blade itself.  You will notice two “Arrows” on either side of the blade platform, and you will notice an indented groove running through the center of the blade platform.

Guides on the blade platform

Guides on the blade platform

To make the magic happen you will need to make use of these guides while cutting within your card stock.  Depending on whether you use the Metric measurement scale or the Inch measurement scale these handy arrows will help you be precise in your cuts.  Pay attention to the arrow on the swing arm guide that you will be referencing.  Use the arrow along the Metric guide if you need to cut in centimeters.  Use the arrow along the Inch guide if you need to cut in inches.

Now, folks, there is some math that needs to be done here.  Following along with my Sample #1, you will need to have two (2) pieces of card stock measuring 4-1/4 x 5-1/2.  Color doesn’t matter, you don’t need to use orange.  It was the first pieces I grabbed.

2 pieces of 4-1/4 x 5-1/2 card stock

2 pieces of 4-1/4 x 5-1/2 card stock

Finding “Center” on the card stock is to divide 4-1/4 x 2 and 5-1/2 x 2.  We are going to be cutting a 2 inch square hole out of the center of the card stock.

Finding "Center"

Finding “Center”

Once you find “Center” it is a matter of determining the measurements of where to begin the cuts along all four sides.

Stick with  me here.  Continue on down through the photos and descriptions.  There is a “Method to my madness” here.  To begin your cut you will need to place one edge of the card stock (4-1/4″ width) on the 1-1/8″ mark of the HORIZONTAL measuring guide.

Line up the card stock to the 1-1/8 inch mark

Line up card stock to the 1-1/8 inch mark

Once you have the card stock lined up properly you will then move on to the VERTICAL guide on the swing arm.  Your blade will be pressed in the card stock at the 1-3/4 inch marking on the swing arm.

Vertical guide at 1-3/4 inches

Vertical guide at 1-3/4 inches

Slide the blade down to the 3-3/4 mark on the Vertical guide.

Cut down to the 3-3/4 inch mark on the vertical guide

Cut down to the 3-3/4 inch mark on the vertical guide

Your cut will look like this.

Your first cut

Your first cut

Now flip the card stock over and place the other 4-1/4 edge along the 1-1/8 in HORIZONTAL measure guide and repeat the same cut you just made along the VERTICAL guide.  You will now have this.

The 2 vertical cuts

The 2 vertical cuts

Now rotate your card stock along the 5-1/2 inch edge.  Along the HORIZONTAL measure guide line up the card stock with the 1-3/4 inch mark.  You will see that the top of the cut you just made is centered within the blade guide.  Look for the black arrow of the second photo to see what I’m referring to.

Along the 5-1/2 edge measure to the 1-3/4 inches

Along the 5-/12 edge measure to 1-3/4 inches

The top of your first cut will be seen within the cutting blade groove

The top of your first cut will be seen within the cutting blade groove

Your blade will be pressed into the card stock along the VERTICAL measure guide at 1-1/8 inches and you will cut down to the 3-1/8 inch mark.  This will connect your two cut lines.

Line up the card stock to 1/34 inches HORIZONTALLY

Line up the card stock to 1-3/4 inches HORIZONTALLY

Begin your cut at 1-1/8 inch and move down to 3-1/8 inches

Begin your cut at 1-1/8 inch and move down to 3-1/8 inches

Your cut will now look like this.

This is the result of your 3 cuts

This is the result of your 3 cuts

Flip your card stock to the other 5-1/2 inch edge and repeat this step.  You will then have a centered square cut out of your card stock.

Repeat the previous measurements and cuts

Repeat the previous measurements and cuts

There you have it.  Centered square

There you have it. Centered square

Now…repeat this entire process to your second piece of card stock.

Repeat the steps.

Repeat the steps.

Now we are going to move on to the Scoring Blade.  Notice this tool has marks a little different from the cutting blade.  You will be using these indicators on the scoring blade to press scores around the box you just cut out.  This will frame the box.  This step is how you will get the “Frame” around the cut similar to a Spellbinder die.

Guides on the Score Blade

Guides on the Score Blade

I have given myself a 1/4 inch gap between the top of the cuts and out on each side.

Score 1/4 inch away from the edge and sides of your cuts

Score 1/4 inch away from the edge and sides of your cuts

Your cuts are now framed

Your cuts are now framed

You can score panels of lines down your card stock if you want to add more dimension and texture.  Line up the 4-1/4 edge along the HORIZONTAL measure guide the width you wish and score down the length of your card stock.

Score lines down the length of your card stock

Score lines down the length of your card stock

The square hole in the card stock will feature a spinning stamped image.  Choose a stamp that will fit in the window with at least a 1/4 inch reveal all around within the square.  You will need to stamp 2 (two) images.

Stamp two images

Stamp two images

Test fit the images to make sure you have plenty of room on all four sides.  Making sure the stamped images won’t get caught on any of the edges or it will not spin properly.

You will need some clear tape, a length of cotton thread – about 10 inches long.

Clear tape and cotton thread

Clear tape and cotton thread

It doesn’t matter if your stamped image is crooked.  IT DOES MATTER that your cotton thread is perfectly straight and centered on the back of one of the images.  The other image you will add the adhesive of your choice to sandwich the cotton thread and hide it.

Attach the cotton thread to one image.

Attach the cotton thread to one image.

Your sandwich will look like this.

Your stamped sandwich

Your stamped sandwich

Now tape the cotton thread tales to the back side of your front piece.  Make sure to have the cotton thread straight before you attach it with the clear tape.  Crooked placement will not be your friend. :/

Center your stamped image

Center your stamped image

Tape the thread tales

Tape the thread tales

Cut off any excess cotton thread that is higher than the top or bottom of your card stock.

Add your favorite adhesive to the other card stock cut out and place over the cotton thread.  You will see that my cotton thread piece is not straight.  My butterfly image is off center.  Thankfully there is enough space around the image and the cuts it will spin freely.

Add adhesive to the cut out cover

Add adhesive to the cut out cover

Place the card stock pieces together

Place the card stock pieces together

Now, using your fingers twist the stamped image around and around until the cotton thread is twisting well.  Let go and you will see your image spinning in circles within the square cut out you just made.

Front of sample #1

Front of sample #1

Back of sample #1

Back of sample #1

This sample will help you to feel confident in working with this kind of design element.  You have the extra boost of confidence knowing that you have not screwed up a perfectly good card base while you are trying something new.

I, generally, try new things out in this way.  If the piece turns to crap then I have not not wasted about 5 card bases trying to get it right. :/

Okay.  It is your turn to try this technique.  Leave a comment below and let me know how you did.  Also, if you are one of those that are masters of the sliding blade trimmer and have other tips to pass on I would love hearing from you as well.

Hope you enjoyed this tutorial.  Leslie

Sliding blade trimmer – Cheap Trick

I have had this idea ramming around in my brain for several years.  I have many excuses for not getting this posted or a video made….I’ll blame it on the time constraints of my old Day Job.

Now seems like an excellent time to discuss this technique, with Thanksgiving and Christmas looming, and since I am no longer a truck driver.  My poor kidneys can’t handle it any longer.  Plus, Joe freaked out on my last trip out with him at the start of this month and he made the decision for me to get off the road.

Okay, enough of that.  Here is what you can do with a Sliding Blade Trimmer.

Sliding Blade Trimmers

Sliding Blade Trimmers

For a budding card maker, with limited room and finances, I can show you how to use your $25 Sliding Blade Trimmer to get this result.  Mind you, the three examples I have for you are practice runs….because I had to reacquaint myself with the awesomeness of this essential paper tool.

Have a look at the three samples I have here.  You can see what can be accomplished with the Sliding Blade Trimmer, some stamps and ink, and some markers and glitter glue.

Back of sample #1

Back of sample #1

Front of sample #1

Front of sample #1

Sample #2

Sample #2

You can’t see the 1/4 inch wide score marks on the Sample #2 because of my bad lighting.

Sample #3

Sample #3

Not everyone can afford to purchase a $100 die cutting machine, the $25 to $50 cost of a Scor-Pal or a Martha Stewart Score Board, nor the cost of the dies at $15 to $25 a pop to make these kinds of cards.

Some people may not have the space in their crafting areas to accommodate a large tool like a die cutting machine or the scoring board,  nor the storage space for the dies.  Cost may not be an issue with them, only the space.

New paper artists may not want to invest in the die cutting machine, scoring board,  nor the dies right now because they might think about waiting a little while to make such a financial commitment toward something they may not use much.

Whichever the reason, all of them valid, you can achieve the same results with the Sliding Blade Trimmer.

The sliding blade trimmer is like the “Swiss Army Knife” of the paper cutting tools.  This trimmer is a true “Multi-Tasker”.  Many new paper artists pick this trimmer because of the low profile and easy portability.  Plus, there are a ton of YouTube videos showcasing this paper trimmer as it cuts through card stock and text weight design paper with ease.  The cutting guide on the trimmer base is used, along with a bone folder, to score the papers.  So, since everyone else uses it then it must be a good product.

There are many drawbacks to using this paper trimmer exclusively.  The one major problem is with the cutting blade.  You have to purchase replacement blades for this trimmer.  When the blade goes bad your paper cuts are no longer clean.  The other drawback is the plastic guide the blade slides along.  After changing the blade many times the guide stretches out a bit and your cuts are no longer true.  They get a bit of a wobble in them.

Over the next couple days I will take you through the steps to create Sample #1 so you get to know your paper trimmer and not beat yourself up about screwing up a perfectly good card base.  Once you master the Sample #1 you can then take on a regular card base to create your own design imagery.

I need to warn you ahead of time….the posts for the Sample #1 item will be PHOTO HEAVY!  That is why I am going to be splitting this up.

I will be making a full video and hope to have it uploaded to YouTube by Saturday – November 22, 2014.

This technique can be used for many occasion greeting cards.  Use stamps featuring a birthday cake or a stack of presents for the birthday person.  Use a stamp featuring a baby stroller to welcome the new little one into a family.  Use a stamp that has a large sentiment, such as “Thank You” or “Congratulations”.  Make a feature window, such as in Sample #2, with a bouquet of flowers or a favorite scene you like to color for a “Get Well” or a “Sympathy” card.

Your imagination, creativity, and card making supplies are all you need.

 

“Will you open your Christmas present so it won’t be in front of the door forever?!”

I don’t do much online ordering.  When I do, the packages are small and light.  Joe, on the other hand, gets deliveries that are large and cumbersome.  Tuesday last, a package arrived.  The poor UPS guy struggled to get it up our ice slick steps and into the house.

Package arrival

Package arrival

The box was covered in snow and ice on one side and one end.  I was the one to get it in the house from the UPS guy.  Once inside and left on the linoleum floor to drip dry I called out to Joe that he had a package.

“That’s YOUR Christmas present” he told me.  :/  That thing is HEAVY!  What could Joe have bought me?  Especially one that would be so heavy?  First thought was it would be something for my least favorite thing in the world to do.  Cooking.  That box had to hold cast iron cookware.

Four days the box sat where it had been placed upon arrival.

That is, until he said the box needed to be removed from in front of the door.  Muttering and some gesturing followed his request.

Hefting the box to the table top was a strenuous exercise.  Once the copious amounts of tape adhered to the flaps was sliced through and the flaps opened all that was seen was white Styrofoam.  I tried to lift the foam out to see what was inside the box.  It was not coming free.  We moved the package to the floor once more and carefully turned it over on its head to remove the cardboard box.  Once the box was removed, and the Styrofoam off, the contents were puzzling.

Bottom of packaged item

Bottom of packaged item

It took the both of us to turn this item back right side up to remove the other part of the Styrofoam packaging.  What appeared was a paper trimmer.  And let me tell you….this is no “Ordinary” paper trimmer!

 

Paper trimmer

Paper trimmer

It took us both to get the paper trimmer up on the table for a closer look.  This thing is constructed of steel.  Not plastic like my other paper trimmers, which are all plastic.

 

Industrial paper trimmer

Industrial paper trimmer

Investigating this item further I  have determined that this is an “Industrial” paper trimmer.  One that will cut through a ream of paper.

People!  A REAM of paper!  500 sheets of paper!

There is a wheel-y thing that turns.

Wheel-y thing

Wheel-y thing

This raises and lowers the “throat” of this massive cutting machine.

Open

Open

Open

Open

Open more

Open more

Nearly fully open

Nearly fully open

My guess is….insert the stack of paper, cardboard, or chipboard…..lower the pressure plate to the top of the stack to secure it in place before cutting.

There, also, is a guide that will keep the paper from slipping while cutting.

Back stop type guide thing-y

Back stop type guide thing-y

This is the “Business” end of the paper trimmer.  A blade which is very sharp.  An over large handle to facilitate the blade action to cut through a ton of paper.

Business end of the paper trimmer

Business end of the paper trimmer

This giant paper trimmer is 24 inches long!

24 inch length of paper trimmer

24 inch length of paper trimmer

The cutting area is 17 inches long.

17 inch cutting area

17 inch cutting area

The next question I will be asked…..”When are you going to get your Christmas present OFF the table?”

I don’t have a place for it in my craft room.  In fact, I have no idea where I’m going to put this thing.

I asked Joe “Why did you think of this?”

His answer, “I thought you could use it to cut out the cardboard and chipboard you have been using.  This would be easier than the craft knife you currently use.”

How could I not love this man?!  The man that believes “There is a tool for every job.”

Guess I had better get busy!  I’ve got chipboard to cut for the little “neck pouches” I’ve made recently.  I have made adjustments to the one that failed.

The pouch is the same width of 4-1/4 inches.

Newest pouch

Newest pouch

It is 1/2 inch deep.  The previous one was only 1/4 inch.

1/2 inch deep

1/2 inch deep

Which has accommodated the placement of eyelets for the ribbon.

Inclusion of eyelets for ribbon

Inclusion of eyelets for ribbon

Same Velcro closures.

Velcro closures

Velcro closures

And a thing-a-ma-bob to allow the ribbon to be adjusted in length.

Ribbon adjuster

Ribbon adjuster

The newest one is now ready for the ribbon and the Velcro.  Both of these pouches have been covered, inside and out, with a clear vinyl self stick contact sheet.

 

Newest pouch

Newest pouch

I will do a post on this newest addition to my craft tools.  Would I recommend this for the average crafter?  No.  This thing weighs about 60 pounds – with packaging.  It is at least 45 pounds all by itself.  The paper trimmer is massive and will need to have a large open space to work.  This is not a tool that can be easily lifted to your work surface then just as easily taken off.

Thank you, Husband mine, for your thoughtful gift 😀

The illusion of straight. And it is just an “illusion”!

I have heard that “black hides many faults” and this time it came in so handy for me.  Although I am thrilled with the success I finally had in making BOX #3…..it is far from being square, plum, or even. 

I’ve seen many videos of people painting only part way on a project.  Me….being a “perfectionist”…..I couldn’t see the reasoning behind the messy paint job that gave me the willies each time I see it happen.  NOW I so appreciate the bad paint job 😀

Painting the outside of the box

Painting the outside of the box

Painting the inside of the box

Painting the inside of the box

The paint I used is by Master’s Touch and I purchased it from Hobby Lobby in the aisle for serious painters.  This is an acrylic paint that is very thick.  I mean THICK.  I had to cut it with water to make it more like the little bottles by Plaid or Folk Art. Let me tell you folks.  This paint STINKS!!!

Master's Touch acrylic paint

Master’s Touch acrylic paint

This paint has a very strong odor.  Unlike anything I’ve ever smelled before.  It has a fairly long “open” time…which just means that it dries SLOWLY!  Even in a thin application.  It is tacky for many HOURS after it has been painted.  In fact, I had to leave it dry overnight before I got to the measuring part of this project.

I had to measure each side…inside and out….on this box – and the lid.  There are no two sides that are totally equal in measurement.  You can see this by the left and right sides of the outside of the box.  I had to hunt for my little pad of Post-It-Notes to keep track of each measurement.  I took the full measurement of the side to be covered then subtracted 1/4 inch from the measurements.

Left side of box

Left side of box

Right side of box

Right side of box

Once I had all the measurements of each stinkin’ surface.  Inside and out.  I had to make a decision which paper I would use.  I chose DCWV’s Mariposa Collection.  I really like the butterfly images on this paper.  And the swirly bits are my favorite as well.

DCWV's Mariposa Collection

DCWV’s Mariposa Collection

I chose this paper for the right and left sides of the box.  The butterflies on the top and bottom of the page are brightly colored and the swirly bits would look great along the bottom of the box.

Paper used for the right and left sides of the box

Paper used for the right and left sides of the box

With the aid of my favorite paper trimmer, the Tonic Studios Guillotine trimmer, I cut the paper for the right and left sides of the box.  Using the bottom set of measurements on the box sides for my cutting guide.

Tonic Studios Guillotine trimmer

Tonic Studios Guillotine trimmer

Left side of box

Left side of box

Right side of box

Right side of box

I have used the second sheet of this paper on some other project and had to find something in the paper stack for the top and bottom of the box. 

Paper used for top and bottom of box

Paper used for top and bottom of box

I haven’t glue these papers on yet.  This is just the “test fit” stage.  Once that part was finished I had to work on the inside of the box and the inside of the lid.  The papers are from the same DCWV Mariposa Collection.  I had only one sheet of each of these papers.

Inside of box

Inside of box

Inside of lid

Inside of lid

Once I got all the papers glued to the box I was pretty pleased with the results.  I have a slew of little Post-It-Notes strewn around 😀

Box end and the lid

Box end and the lid

Box side and lid

Box side and the lid

Inside of box and lid

Inside of box and lid

Box bottom and lid top

Box bottom and lid top

This box will now sit for a day or two to allow that acrylic paint to fully cure and the glue I used to attach the paper to fully dry.  I test fitted the lid to the box and ended up with a sticky situation.  I had to work at prying the lid off the box and checking for damage done in my haste.

Now I’m contemplating if I need to add some rhinestones, flat backed pearls, and some lace to the box and lid.  I’m torn between leaving it as it is or blinging it up.

As you can see.  The black paint applied in such a messy fashion has “framed” the papers well.

One other thing.  This paper has a white back to it.  It is not double sided decorative paper.  After cutting the pieces I had to use some Tim Holtz Walnut Stain Distress Ink to the edges of the paper to hide the white edge.

Walnut Stain Distress Ink

Walnut Stain Distress Ink

White paper edges

White paper edges

After the Walnut Stain

After the Walnut Stain

I can add “Illusionist” to my many talents 😀  Well…..maybe not.

 

 

Stationary Box with cards.

Around August, maybe even September, while traveling the US highways in my day job I had an idea floating around in my bored brain.  Making a gift box filled with greeting cards, gift tags, and small 3″ x 3″ note cards.

While, briefly, home in October I went to the Club Scrap website to see what they had to offer.  I get their notices of sales on all of their stuff.  One item in particular I had to have.  The Serenity Stationary Hideaway kit.  Sadly doing a search on their site for this item no longer shows the kit.  They must have sold out of these.

Serenity Stationery Hideaway kit by Club Scrap

The card sizes to be held in this gift box will measure:

  • 3.25 (3-1/4″) x 4.75 (4-3/4″)
  • 4.25 (4-1/4″) x 5.5 (5-1/2″)

As you can see, in the above photo, there are two spaces that are just the right size for an assortment of gift tags and another spot for 3″ x 3″ note cards with envelopes.

What you will need to create your stationary box.

  1. Paper trimmer that will cut 12″ x 12″ paper.
  2. 4 sheets of 12″ x 12″ cover weight (heavy) card stock.
  3. Scoring board that will fit 12″ x 12″ paper.  If you don’t have a scoring board you can use a ruler and a bone folder or stylus to make all the score lines.
  4. White glue of any kind.  Whichever you prefer.
  5. You can use a hot glue gun as well.
  6. Scissors.
  7. Bone folder.
  8. Lastly, you will need some paperclips, binding clips, or clothes pins.

The box I am creating will hold Christmas cards.  I’m using Club Scrap’s “Musical Interlude” papers which came out in the early 2000’s.  Three sheets of the 12″ x 12″ are the Musical Interlude paper and I don’t remember what the plain red card stock is from.

Club Scrap "Musical Interlude" card stock

The red card stock with the trumpets will be the box lid.  The plain red card stock will be the box.  Score all four sides of the card stock lid paper at 1-5/8″.

Score all four sides at 1-5/8".

Scored lid piece

For the box itself you will score all four sides at 1-3/4″.  Sorry for the blurry photo.  I’m not very ambidextrous.

Score box sides at 1-3/4".

Box paper scored

Now for the box inserts.  You will need two pieces of heavy weight, or cover weight, card stock for this.  From one sheet of 12″ x 12″ card stock you will get the two smaller inserts.  The first cut will be at 4-1/4″ x 12″.

Cut insert card stock at 4-1/4" x 12".

Turn the 4-1/4″ paper horizontal and cut at 11-1/2″.

Cut the 4-1/4" paper horizontal at 11-1/2"

4-1/4" x 11-1/2"

Next will be the other small insert.  This one measures 4″ x 11-1/2″.  Use the remainder of the card stock you cut the 4-1/4″ piece from.

Cut the card stock at 4" x 12".

Flip the 4″ x 12″ card stock horizontally to cut at 11-1/2″.

Turn the 4" x 12" paper horizontal and cut at 11-1/2".

Insert cut at 4" x 11-1/2"

The final insert is larger and you will use the other piece of 12″ x 12″ card stock for this.  This piece of card stock will be cut at 8-3/8″ x 11-1/2″.

Cut 12" x 12" card stock at 8-3/8" x 12"

Flip the 8-3/8″ x 12″ horizontally and cut at 11-1/2″.

Cut the 8-3/8" x 12" card stock horizontally to 11-1/2"

You will have two left over pieces of the 12″ x 12″ card stock from your three insert pieces.  You can use these in your cards or set them aside for a different project.

Scrap pieces from cutting the inserts

Next we will be scoring the insert pieces.  Begin with the 4-1/4″ x 11-1/2″ piece.

Find the 4-1/4" insert piece and put in the score board

Along the 11-1/2″ length you will be making your score marks.

Make scores along the 11-1/2" side

First score is at 2-1/2″.

Score at 2-1/2"

Second score is at 4″.

Second score is at 4"

Third score is at 5-1/2″.

Score at 5-1/2"

The reverse side of the 4-1/2″ x 11-1/2″ insert piece that has been scored.

4-1/2" x 11-1/2" scored insert

Next will be the 4″ x 11-1/2″ insert piece.

Check to make sure you have the right paper in the score board.  I get so distracted a times that I don’t check and I make a mess up and have to cut more paper.  This time it would be really bad because these are the only two pieces of this instrumental paper I have.

Get your 4" x 11-1/2" insert piece

Place it horizontally on your score board.

Place the 4" insert piece horizontally on your score board

Your first score will be at 3″.

First score will be at 3"

Second score will be at 4-1/2″

Second score will be at 4-1/2"

Third score will be at 6″.

Third score will be at 6"

The back of your 4″ x 11-1/2″ scored insert will look like this.

Reverse side o the 4" x 11-1/2" scored insert

Now you will make one mountain and two valley folds.  This is important.  The middle score line will be the mountain fold.  Press and crease both of these inserts.

Make sure the center score lines are mountain folds

The last piece to score is the 8-3/8″ x 11-1/2″ insert.  You can’t mix this one up with the other two 4’s.  Should not have said that, I’ll go and do it the next time 😦

This piece will be scored first on the 11-1/2″ horizontal  width at 4-1/8″.

First score is at 4-1/8" on the 8-3/8" x 11-1/2" insert

The second score is at 5-5/8″.

Second score is at 5-5/8"

The third, and final, score is at 7-1/8″.

Final score is at 7-1/8"Just as you do with the previous two inserts.  The center score will be the mountain fold while the outer two will be the valley folds.

The center score line will be the mountain fold and the other two will be the valley folds

Next step is glue.  Use a white glue of our choice. Or the hot glue.  I’m not a fan of  hot glue because it attacks me.  I don’t care for things that bite and I give them a wide berth.  Another thing I don’t like about hot glue is all the spider web like stringers that it leaves behind.

Any white glue of your choosing

Or hot glue.

Or hot glue

You will also need to have a good supply of paperclips, or clothes pins, or binder clips.

You will also need paperclips, binder clips, or clothes pins

The lid and the box will be constructed in the same exact manner for each of them.  Using scissors, cut the fold line from the bottom of the paper up to the fold line.  Do not cut passed the fold line.  You will do this on two sides of the paper.

Cut the bottom edge at the fold line up to the fold line

When finished your box or lid piece will look like this.

After cutting your lid or box will look like this

Do this same thing to both the lid and the top.

Starting at any corner of the box or the lid, fold in one of the flaps and test fit it into the corner.

Test fit one of the flaps into the corner

You will see that the flap piece extends over the top of the box or lid side just a smidge.  You will need to cut away a small amount of the paper to solve this problem.

Cut away a small bit of the tab edge on a diagonal

This will allow the tab to fit properly in the box or lid corner without peaking out over the top and making both the box and lid ill fitting.

Professional looking finished edge

Complete this step on all four sides of both the lid and the box.  It helps to crease your score lines well with a bone folder before you get to the actual gluing part….which is next.

Fold the flap back on the side.  This will give you a reference of where you put the glue.

Fold the tab back onto the side wall for easy gluing reference

Add the glue of your choice – white glue or hot glue.

Add your adhesive to the tab

If using white glue spread it around in an even layer from the crease line out to the three cut edges.

Spread the glue on the tab

Adhere the tab to the side wall.  Making sure to line up the edges well while creating your corner.

Adhere the tab to the side wall creating your corner

Attach your clip to the glued on tab.

Attach the clip to your glued tab

Do this to all four corners of each of the box and lid segments of this box.

Glue and clamp all four corners of your box and lid

Now we will be gluing the insert pieces.  You will do these next steps the same way with all three of the insert pieces.

Next to get glue will be the insert pieces

Add the adhesive of your choice to one of the inner mountain folds.

Add glue to the inner area of one of the mountain sides

Spread the glue out evenly.  This time it is not critical that you don’t get glue all over the place.  The mountain fold will be glued to itself.

Spread the glue out evenly

Then press the inner mountain pieces together and apply pressure along the width of the fold.

Adhere the mountain fold pieces together

Attach the clamps of your choice to the glued mountain folds.

Add your "clamps" to the glue mountain folds

Once the glue has dried…about an hour….remove the clamps from all of your pieces.  Lay the larger insert into the bottom of your box.

Lay the large insert into the bottom of your box

Next you will add one of the smaller inserts into the left side of your box.  It doesn’t matter which one you pick up first.

Lay one of the smaller inserts in the left side of the box

Your last small insert will be laid on the right side of the box.  Place it in so the mountain fold is going in the opposite direction of the one on the left.

Lay the second insert in the right section of the box

Test fit your lid.  It will fit, I assure you.

Test fit your lid

Now take a look at your handiwork and get to making cards that will fit in the four sections of this box.  Don’t spend too much time looking at my table top.  I’ve got a mess going on there.

Time to pat  yourself on the back

I hope to have this filled with Christmas cards, gift tags, and note cards in the next few days.  I’m quite busy with Joe and all of his various doctor appointments after his emergency appendectomy in Chandler, Arizona last week.  Let me tell you….that man has more “Ologists” he’s seeing now than I can keep straight.

  1. Urologist
  2. Nephrologist
  3. Cardiologist
  4. Neurologist
  5. Oncologist
  6. Pulmanologist

I’m really surprised he isn’t glowing in the dark with all the X-rays, CT scans, MRI’s, and sonograms he’s had over the past week.  So if you think I have “done a runner” it is only to the doctors around the Oklahoma City Metro Area.

His CT scans and X-rays done in Arizona show some areas of his lungs that are a little worrisome to the doctors.  I’ll post my creations when I can.  I’m also going to be tied up with my bookwork and some much needed house cleaning while home.  Crapazoid 😦

Sis, thanks for checking in on me the other day to see if I was still alive 😉  Now you can see what I’ve been up to…a great mess is what I’ve been up to 😀
Hope you all have a great weekend and will be able to get some crafting done.  If you have any questions about the construction of this stationery box leave a comment with your question and I will do my best to answer them.

Leslie

 

 

Tags – Cutting Directions

Are you ready to get some gift tags made?

Clear a space off your work area – kitchen table, craft desk, the floor, or your bed – we are going to get busy with some cutting 🙂

You will need three items to do this.  Four if you want to print these instructions off for your reference.

  1. Paper trimmer that is large enough to accommodate 12 x 12 card stock.
  2. Two (2) pieces of 12 x 12 card stock in the colors of your choice.  NOTE:  Patterned paper, CARD STOCK weight, can be used on these tags.  The lighter weight patterned papers are not really good for this.
  3. A bone folder.

That is all you will need.  Both pieces of the 12 x 12 card stock will be cut exactly the same way.

These first cuts will be made vertically down the 12 x 12 paper.  You will have a total of five (5) strips after this first go round.  You will have two (2) 3-1/2 x 12 strips, two (2) 1-3/4 x 12 strips, and one (1) 1-1/2 by 12 strip.

  1. With the 12 x 12 piece of card stock aligned in your paper trimmer, make the following vertical cuts….
  2. 10-1/2 inches,
  3. 8-3/4 inches
  4. 7 inches
  5. 3-1/2 inches.  You will be left with two (2) 3-1/2 x 12 pieces of card stock when you finish this set of cuts.

Working with the 3-1/2 x 12 strips, remember there are two (2) of them.  You can cut them at one time or separately.  Depends on your trimmer capabilities.

  1. Turn your 3-1/2 x 12 strip(s) horizontally in your paper trimmer and cut at…
  2. 8 inches and
  3. 4 inches.

You will have a total of six (2) 3-1/2 x 4 pieces of card stock.  These will be your tag bases.

Next, you will be cutting the 1-3/4 x 12 strips.  Remember, there are two (2) of these also.  You can cut them together or one at a time.

  1. Place the 1-3/4 x 12 strip(s) horizontally in your trimmer and cut at….
  2. 9 3/4 inches,
  3. 6-1/2 inches,
  4. 3-1/4 inches.

You will have a total of six (6) 1-3/4 x 3-1/4 pieces.  Plus there will be two (2) 1-3/4 x 2-1/4 pieces of scrap.

The final piece will be the 1-1/2 x 12 strip of card stock.

  1. Place the 1-1/2 x 12 strip horizontally in your trimmer and make your cuts at….
  2. 10-1/2 inches,
  3. 9 inches,
  4. 7-1/2 inches,
  5. 6 inches,
  6. 4-1/2 inches,
  7. and 3 inches.

You will have a total of six (6) 1-1/2 x 1-1/2 inch squares and one 1-1/2 x 3 inch piece of scrap.

Now repeat these directions on your second piece of card stock.

Once you have completed all of your cuts, you will then move on to scoring and folding the tag bases.  Each 3-1/2 x 4 inch piece will be scored and folded at 2 inches.  You will end up with a folded tag that measures 3-1/2 x 2 inches.  You will have six (6) of one color and six (6) of your other color for a total of 12 folded tags.

The 1-3/4 x 3-1/4 pieces will be used as mattes on your tags.  Run them through an embossing folder, round the edges, distress the edges, ink the edges…..whatever your heart desires.  The 1-1/2 x 1-1/2 pieces will be mounted on your tag in any fashion you desire.

You can watch my YouTube video on these cutting directions if you find my written directions “clear as mud” 🙂