Budget friendly Christmas presents from your local hardware store.

My thoughts have been centered around the hardware store recently.  Oh the wonders one can find in a store dedicated to destruction and reconstruction.  Take a little trip through the hardware store for supplies to make Christmas presents.

If you don’t have a “Big Box” hardware store in your area you might have to check out your local flooring center for today’s project idea.  I got my supplies from my local Lowe’s Home Improvement Center.

Lowe's Home Improvement Center

Lowe’s Home Improvement Center

Coasters are used in many homes to protect the furniture tops from beverage mishaps.  Heat rings from a hot mug of coffee, water rings left behind when iced beverages drip condensation.  You can find plenty of coasters at your local stores.  Wood, fiber, ceramic, porcelain.  Some with inspirational phrases, colors, graphic designs, and even some you can personalize with your photos.

The price range of this decor item varies.  Cheap and inexpensive to quality with a high end price tag.  Most coasters I have seen in stores come in a set of four.

For this project, I have selected four porcelain tiles that measure 4″ x 4″.  The tile costs were 17 cents a piece.  The felt protective feet came in a set of 20 for $2.97.  If you have Mod Podge glue, or something similar, in your craft supplies this project will cost you less that $5 for one of a kind gift giving.

Altered porcelain tiles

Altered porcelain tiles

I used one of the last few papers from my DCWV Mariposa paper collection on these tiles.  My supply of Mod Podge was seriously depleted.  I went to my Michaels craft store to purchase more and found a formulation that is “Dishwasher Safe”.  This Mod Podge dries completely with no sticky or tacky feel after fully curing.  I don’t, as a general rule, use Mod Podge because of that one problem I have with it.  Living in a humid area this glue tends to be tacky for a long time before it fully cures.  Sometimes even weeks after project completion.

The Mod Podge set me back $9 and I had to purchase another tube of E-6000 which was an additional $5.  These two products will have a long shelf life in my craft room and will be used on other projects in the future so the cost can be spread out over the years.

I used the E-6000 to adhere the felt feet on the back of the tiles.  This is to ensure no furniture damage will occur when moving or stacking the tile coasters on table tops.  If you would like to have a full tutorial on making these tile coasters, I have a video for you.

Leslie

How to cover chipboard with paper.

Okay, this one you will have to use your imagination a little bit.  I got so carried away with attaching the paper to the chipboard pieces I forgot to take photos of the process.

I’m using liquid glue to attach the papers.  The first thing to do is get the adhesive of  your choice on the chipboard first.  Use a tape runner, Scor-Tape, red liner tape, wet glue, Mod Podge, whatever you prefer.  Get the adhesive to all outer edges of the chipboard and in the middle section.

Attach the paper you have chosen.  You can cut the paper ahead of time if you know the dimensions.  I cut the papers at 3-1/2 inches by 8-1/2 inches to cover the off cuts from the chipboard I cut in the previous post.  For this process I prefer using liquid glue.  I have a small window of time to move the paper around to fit properly by using the glue.  I don’t have much success with the dry adhesives.  I have ruined too much paper and chipboard when the danged dry adhesive sticks to the chipboard in the wrong place :/

Adhere the paper to the chipboard

Adhere the paper to the chipboard

BEFORE you mount the paper on the back side of the chipboard piece make sure to punch the holes for the notebook binding.  Want to have a swear session?  Just cover the both sides of the chipboard and hunt around for the holes :/  Trust me….I’ve done this a time or two and I speak from experience.

Punch any holes before you do the back

Punch any holes before you do the back

Now you can safely cover the back of the chipboard.  The holes will be easy to punch because you have taken the time to do it on the front side.

 

Cover the back side and punch any holes

Cover the back side and punch any holes

The problem with using a liquid glue in this application is the water content that soaks into the chipboard and causes the pieces to warp.  Don’t worry.  I have my “highly technical” press ready.  Using wax paper, place a sheet on a flat surface.  In this case it is my cleared off kitchen table.  Lay the glued pieces atop the wax paper and put another layer of wax paper on top of this.  Continue with your wax paper and glued chipboard sandwich.  When all pieces are ready for the press put something flat over the top of the “sandwich” and then add some weight.

 

Warping chipboard

Warping chipboard

Sandwich chipboard pieces to dry between wax paper

Sandwich chipboard pieces to dry between wax paper

Place something flat over the sandwich

Place something flat over the sandwich

Place something heavy to act as a press

Place something heavy to act as a press

For the larger pages with the tabbed dividers I had to go through my stash of 12 x 12 papers to.  I didn’t have the foresight to purchase extra paper when I went shopping.  So I will have to find paper from my stash that will compliment the colors of the new stuff.

Creative Imaginations

Creative Imaginations

Creative Imaginations

Creative Imaginations

Imaginisce

Imaginisce

Club Scrap

Club Scrap

Use the adhesive of your choice to the chipboard and lay it out on the paper you will cover the glued side with.  Once the paper is fully adhered use a craft knife to cut around the chipboard piece.  Remember to punch your holes before covering the other side.

Attaching the paper and cutting around the chipboard

Attaching the paper and cutting around the chipboard

This new thing I am attempting to do….Put Things Away….is getting easier to do.  I still have to talk to myself and make sure that I do it :/  The bag which held my purchases is coming in handy for this project.  All the papers are together.

Clean up as I go

Clean up as I go

I like coming into my “Studio” now.  Space for mojo to happen 😀

 

Orderly work table

Orderly work table

I hope this has been of help to anyone that is thinking about covering chipboard with paper.  Now I have to put these pages under my press and wait until tomorrow to begin the hard part.  Designing the layouts.

Leslie

 

Altered Photo Frame

I took the weekend off from my “day job” paperwork to do some SERIOUS work instead.

In Lebanon, Missouri on I-44 at exit 127 is a discount store – Shepherd Hills – we stop at every time we are on that stretch of highway.  I find bargains there for my crafting as well as really good deals on Chicago Cutlery kitchen knives and OXO kitchen tools.  Our most recent trip I picked up some really good solid wood picture frames.

Wood picture frame

Wood picture frame

Can’t beat the price at $2.55 and I bought three of them.

The people we rely on to keep us working are barged in on and expected to perform at, virtually, a moments notice.  Our poor vehicle mechanics are just one of the professionals we rely on.  A call to their shop to give a heads up on when we plan on being home and for how long, then a phone consultation on the vehicle problem.  Day of arrival at the shop is always hectic with several vehicles way ahead in line before us.  These guys always manage to get us in and out right away.

As a way of showing our appreciation for the work they do and how they don’t put us off for some other day that is more convenient for them I have created a clock.

This project is pretty simple.  I went to a local glass place to have a 3/8 hole drilled in the piece of glass on the picture frame.  They tried it with their glass and it broke in half so I scrapped that idea.  I had Joe cut an 8 x 10 piece of wood I’ve had in my craft room closet for a number of years.  A bit of acrylic paint, some appropriately themed vintage pictures, and photos of Joe’s tools, along with the clock work pieces I spent the weekend creating this piece.

Give this a try with your own photos and favorite scrapbook papers and embellishments.  I’ve made a YouTube video of the process I went through.  Hope this sparks your creative process.  Maybe create a clock for your craft room or make a gift for someone you care about and appreciate.

Happy crafting – Leslie

Altered Momento Holder

Momento Holder

Momento Holder

This framed wooden box, with glass lid, is usually used to display a medal or service pins.

Shepherd Hills Outlet store in Lebanon, Missouri is a place we stop when we travel on I-44 in Missouri, either east or west.  Last September there was a three foot stack of these display boxes for sale.  Original price was $12.99 but I got it for $7.49.  I only bought one since I was not sure what I was going to do with it.  This holder has sat on a shelf in my room since then.

Front of altered medal box

Front of altered medal box

This is now the outside front of the box.

Glass front

Glass front

Inside of box

Inside of box

YES!!!  I’ve used flowers and GLITTER.  The glitter I will get to and it is some really stunning stuff.

Back of the box

Back of the box

This box has been specially made for the owner of Whole Lotta Scrap in Norman, Oklahoma – Leslie – who recently lost her husband.  I’m not a very good card maker – YET.

Some things I’ve learned in creating this box:

Twinkling H2O's

Twinkling H2O's

At Whole Lotta Scrap this product by Lumiarte can be purchased in single pots, in bottles of shimmer paint, or in this multiple pack.  Not having seen this product before I opted for the multiple pack.  It comes with a spritzer bottle which is used to wet the pots.

Notice the butterfly cut out I have circled in the orange red oval in the photo above.  This is what it looked like after I applied the Twinkling H2O’s.

Butterfly with Twinkling H2O's

Butterfly with Twinkling H2O's

Using a fine tipped paint brush to stir the water I spritzed into the pot of yellow I painted it on the plain butterfly.  It is translucent enough to allow the fine lines printed on the butterfly to show through while the glimmer and color show up vibrantly.  I used my heat tool to dry the yellow before I went on to adding the blue color.  I did not want the vibrant blue turning to green as you can see happening at the top edge of the butterfly wings.

The next thing I learned:

Tim Holtz Idea-ology Facets

Tim Holtz Idea-ology Facets

I have had the EK Success “Fresh Cuts” tag things for a really, really, really, long time.

Glossy Accents, Facets, and tag

Glossy Accents, Facets, and tag

The mistake I made was to put w-a-a-a-a-a-y too much Glossy Accents on the back of the Facet then press it down on the tag.  The Glossy Accents squeezed out of it like crazy.  In my attempt to get the excess glue cleaned up with a paper towel I smeared the Glossy Accents onto the Facet itself.

After I got the glue cleaned up I quickly saturated a cotton ball with alcohol and wiped the Facet clean of the Glossy Accents.  While the glue is still “wet” it can be successfully removed from the Facet using the alcohol without damaging the plastic surface and causing it to “fog” over.  I then left it as you see it for over an  hour to dry before trimming away the excess paper.

Facet hanging from tag

Facet hanging from tag

Once more I had to enlist the aid of my “Scrubby” to finish this project.

My "Scrubby"

My "Scrubby"

Joe was tasked with drilling a hole in the front frame to attach a cabinet door knob.  I needed a screw with a flat head so it could be safely covered by the glass and not break when installing.

Here is a photo montage of the process and products I’ve used in this project.

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The Frame Job

Sorry, couldn’t think of a proper title to this post.  Still it fits, sort of.

In an attempt to be a “tutorial” in making something similar to what I’m doing…just in case there is someone who might like to attempt this but doesn’t know what to do….I’m about to bore you with the details.

Mod  Podge.  I really like this stuff and have used so much of it over the past couple of months that I have to make a trip to Michaels or Hobby Lobby to buy more of the stuff.  I wonder if they make this stuff in gallon jugs?

Mod Podge over acrylic paint

Mod Podge over acrylic paint

First, the paper you will use to cover the surface of the wood.  Draw around the block on the paper and then cut it out.  Test fit it, make any snips of excess paper until there are no areas of overhang.  Ink the edges and then get ready to mount the paper.

Apply to both surfaces

Apply to both surfaces

Apply the Mod Podge to both surfaces, the wood and the back of the paper.  This will allow for a “slippery” bit when you are positioning the paper.  This allows you to move the paper around into position without tearing it.  Otherwise, just putting the Mod Podge only to the wood and not the paper (or to the paper and not the wood) is almost instant adhesion which is a bad thing.  No wiggle room.  You get what you get and can’t change it without much damage and a few bad words.  Trust me, I know what I’m speaking of…bad words and all.

Apply pressure

Apply pressure

You have to smooth the paper over the wood first before you apply the use of the brayer.  The paper will tend to move around under the brayer as you apply pressure if you don’t take the first step in applying hand pressure.  Move the brayer all across the surface and make sure to go both diagonal from corner to corner and across from left to right.  Make sure  you get the corners good so they don’t come up later.

Wipe up excess glue

Wipe up excess glue

The glue will squeeze out as you use the brayer.  Just wipe up the excess and continue on with the application of pressure until no more glue oozes out.

Same process to all blocks

Same process to all blocks

Isn’t that “beautimous”?!  I love the look of this paper.  It is gracing the back of the blocks instead of being hidden beneath the delightful photos on the front.  No, it is not embossed and bumpy.  It just looks like that and I love the look of it.

Rub and Buff

Rub and Buff

This is a small tube.  Don’t be fooled by the size because this stuff is like the old Brylcream “A little dab ‘l do ‘ya”.  Oh and it has a fairly strong smell of turpentine or one of those chemicals.  You don’t need to fling open the windows and use this in a well ventilated area.  Only if  you are of the unfortunate few that get slamming bad headaches from noxious smells.

Just a dab

Just a dab

This might even be too much for the small area to cover.  Just remember a small dab will work great.

Ohhhh, shiny gold

Ohhhh, shiny gold

If you want a more pronounced golden shimmer then you can use more.  I just want to have a light touch of it.

Isn't that pretty?

Isn't that pretty?

After this dries it will continue to have this beautiful shiny glow.  Love this stuff and am so glad I learned of this stuff.

Ooops, too much

Ooops, too much

My phone rang and startled me as I was applying a light touch with the Rub and Buff.  This one gets a full schmear instead of a light touch.  If you find that you have this kind of an “accident” use a paper towel to rub, and rub, and rub, and rub (you get what I’m saying) until most of the Rub and Buff is wiped off.  Then apply it again with the light touch.

Okay, my job is over for right now.  It is now time for my Scrubby to take over.  I just love it that he helps me when I ask and drops all that he is doing just be help.  Gotta love that man of mine, and I surely do.

Bear paw in a small package

Bear paw in a small package

I had to laugh a little watching him struggle with the small package of hinges and screws.  His big old bear paws fumbling around in the little space with the tiny sized pieces.  “Oh, shut up” is what I earned from my laughter 🙂

Do the job right the first time

Do the job right the first time

I knew I had the right person on this task.  He’s getting the pieces just right before he puts them in the clamp to hold them in place.

Clamped and ready

Clamped and ready

My Scrubby has lots of toys at his disposal.  This clamp has a swivel head so he can get the clamped object in the right spot to work on.

Marking the spot

Marking the spot

He has both hands free to hold the hinge in place and mark the holes.  That clamp thing is quite handy.  Hmmmm, wonder how I can appropriate it and take it to my room?  After all…”What’s mine is mine and what’s his is mine”.  Right?

Ooops.  Electric eraser time

Oooops. Electric eraser time

He has an electric eraser.  Can you believe it?!  Well it sure works after he slipped the hinge just a smidge and had to remark the area.

Drilling pilot holes

Drilling pilot holes

This wood is hard, really hard.  Scrubby was afraid he’d split the wood if he just tried to “Power” through with the screws.  Something I would have attempted to do had it been up to me.  So glad I have him to rely on with this many talents.

Attaching the screws

Attaching the screws

Another electric tool.  He’s got a few of them and they are “Designated” for certain things.  I’ve been warned about his power tools and so I stay away from them.  Well, not really.  I have been known to sneak in when he is hundreds of miles away and can’t do anything about it to use his tools.

Other side

Other side

One side down, now on to the other side.  He makes this look so easy.

Head shot

Head shot

I couldn’t resist.  It was there, what can I say.

Marking the holes

Marking the holes

He’s taken care to not have the same thing happen as with the other side.  He’s got a better grip on the hinge this time.  No more electric eraser 😦

Pilot holes

Pilot holes

Yes, I know you saw this before but I can’t help myself when my Scrubby has his power tools and is using them.  I just love to watch this man work and you are subjected to what I like.

Hinge installed

Hinge installed

Now aren’t you glad you sat through all of this.  Look at that hinge!  Beautiful isn’t it 🙂  Or not.

Done with the first part

Done with the first part

I love this paper, and it looks so good now that it is hinged.  I think I’ve come unhinged.

One last block

One last block

This is the block that will be at the top.  Held with two L Brackets.

Give it a Whack

Give it a Whack

The wood proved to be a little recalcitrant when he tried to first drill the pilot hole.  His bit would not bite into the wood.  So he had to resort to whacking it with a punch.  Look at the photo.  You can see the arc of his hammer as he hit the punch.  The ghosting of the hammer is way too cool.

Taa Daa

Taa Daa

Maureen had sent me photos of her Christmas gathering with her Mom and children last year.

Charlie's spot

Charlie's spot

Patients just don’t consider a doctor’s family on the holidays and poor Charlie had to miss the festivities.  I did make sure to have a spot for him.  At the head of the family.  I used my ATG gun to adhere the photos to the blocks and you can do the same when you select a photo for your Honey Bunny, Stud Muffin, Sugar Plum, or whatever you call him.

Thank you Maureen for being a customer of mine.  I appreciate you in many, many ways.  Mostly as a good friend and as my Big Sis….even though you are considerably younger than me 🙂

Handy Man Bulletin Board

My Son-In-Law’s birthday is tomorrow, November 12th.  I’m already late on getting this to him but I hope he will forgive me when he finally gets it.

I had asked my daughter what his favorite color was and what kinds of things he likes.   I told her I had planned on making him a bulletin board for his home office when he does the monthly budgeting, which he is really good at, by the way.  She told him what I was doing and asked what he wanted.  His response was “Red and silver.  Like Craftsman.”  First it threw me for a loop because she TOLD him what I was doing then I went all wonky because I had no idea what to do now.

I had planned on making his bulletin board on Lynn Claredge’s (liveupstairs) “Grid Card” thing.  I was going to have a photo of Carissa and Jaime attached to the cork then have little thought bubble like things all over the board with things they are planning and thinking about.  A desired trip to Italy, a cruise to some exotic port, a new house.  Well…that idea was now out of the picture.

Handyman Bulletin Board

This is what I came up with.  Since he desired “Craftsman red and silver”, I’d give him something sort of like he wishes.

The papers used on his cork board are all retired Stampin’ Up! “Thoroughly Modern” and Real Red textured 12 x 12 card stock.

I’ve used the White Gel Pen on the face of the tool box in a couple places.  You will see where in the photos later in this post.

I have used some embellishments I had to get from a local craft/hobby store since I don’t have stamps of these images.  I’ve also used foam core board to strengthen the embellishments for using as push pins as I’ve designed them to be.

I’m surprised this turned out to be fairly simple to do.  Once I got off my “High Horse” and came back down to the real world then the wheels began turning.

Image from the internet

I went to a well known tool internet site and looked at the images of their tool boxes.  They all looked pretty complicated and I was not sure how I was going to do this.  I hit on this tool box.  Dragging the image to my desk top I selected the print option on my computer and chose to make this image 8 x 10 and to fit the entire page.

Once I had that printed out to a good size I went into my room and began to seriously think about what I was going to do.

First, I used Repositional Adhesive on the outer edge of the paper and secured the image to a  self healing mat I have.

Craft knife to cut pieces out

"Drawers" placed on black card stock

Using a craft knife I cut the image into pieces that would be placed on the Real Red 12 x 12 textured card stock and on Basic Black 8-1/2 x 11 card stock.

This was a bit of a challenge for me, since I’ve not done this before, and I was not sure where to begin so I just “winged” it.

Shading the card stock

Using the image as a guide in shading

I carefully cut the copy paper image so I could fold it away and use a Sponge Dauber and Chocolate Chip ink to do the shading on the “lid” of the tool box.

Folding the copy paper back in the areas to be shaded is the technique I used.  The results were pretty good.

Highlighting with the gel pen

Highlighting and shading completed

Using the white gel pen and the Chocolate Chip ink I did the shading and definition of the lid and highlighting of areas.

Really, this is quite easy to do.  Fold the copy paper back to the desired area and do your rubbing with the ink or lightly trace the area with the gel pen.  By this time I was beginning to feel less out of my depth and getting more stoked about what I was attempting.

Marking the drawers and the handles

Scoring the area of the handles

Marked and ready to paint

Using my ruler I placed it on the lines of the copy paper image and then pulled it away from the card stock.  Using the gel pen to mark the “drawer” definition and the Bone Folder to mark the area to be painted with silver acrylic paint for the drawer handles was not very hard to do.

Test fitting the pieces

Making sure I have not missed anything before it gets glued

After I was done with the shading, highlighting, and painting I gave these pieces a “test fit” to make sure they would all assemble together and look somewhat like the original photo did.

Looking pretty good right now, so it is time to get the cork board/bulletin board ready to mount papers and this piece pattern thing I just finished.

Cork board/bulletin board

Papers attached and pattern piece adhered

I mounted the “Thoroughly Modern” paper to the cork using Mod Podge.  The Creamy Caramel polka dot paper is supposed to be a “Peg Board” with the darker, Close to Cocoa paper as the frame.

Using Mod Podge I attached the tool box pieces to the red side of the board.  Looks pretty awesome, if I must say so myself 🙂

Sticker embellishments from the craft store

Reverse side of the embellishments

As I selected each embellishment I removed the foam tape from the backs of the pieces.  I would not be using it in this application.  It would just be in the way so the foam tape is carefully removed.

I’m going to be using some heavy duty adhesive to permanently stick these embellishments down so a bit of the foam tape left on the back is not going to cause a problem.

Trace around the embellishment on Foam Core board

Use a craft knife to cut the shape out of the Foam Core board

These embellishments are going to be push pins.  They need to be very sturdy and strong.  Chipboard is just not firm enough to keep from bending.  I’ve opted for 1/4″ Foam Core board.

Tracing the shape of the embellishment to the Foam Core board then cutting it out with the craft knife is what I am doing.  It is so much easier to use the craft knife when cutting on this stuff than scissors.  The scissors tend to pinch the Foam Core and alter the shape of it at the edges.

E6000 adhesive

Applied to the Foam Core board

I don’t want the embellishment to separate from the Foam Core so I’ve chosen to use E6000 adhesive.  This is the really strong stuff.

It is also quite strong smelling stuff.  You don’t need to use in a well ventilated room, and it is not going to make you “high” but it does have a very strange odor.  And it is kind of sticky slimy when you get it on your fingers.  Washes off your hands with soap and water.  Not sure if it will come out of clothing though so just watch what you are doing.

Marking the "Peg Board"

Everything has a place and everything in its place

Once I had all the embellishments mounted on the Foam Core board and they were finally dry, I took each piece to the “Peg Board” side of the cork board and drew around the embellishment with a Basic Black Stampin’ Write Marker.

The cork board is now beginning to come together and look like what I had envisioned it to be.  🙂

Generic Push Pins

E6000 to adhere push pin

On the back side of the Foam Core embellishments I used the E6000 to attach the push pins to the embellishment.

The push pins are just generic ones I got from my craft/hobby store.

A good dollop of the E6000 on the push pin head then pushed down on the back of the embellishment and allow the adhesive to puddle around the head to seal it on.

Oops, that's not good

Much better

Mechanics in the truck dealerships we go to from time to time, to have a truck worked on, display photos of family and friends on the inside lid of their tool boxes.

I printed out some really cute photos of Carissa and Jaime on copy paper and attached them to 1″ square pieces of Foam Core board and E6000 adhesive.  As the adhesive was drying the black of the Foam Core began to bleed through the copy paper 😦  Not a good thing.  I printed the photos again but this time on Photo Paper and that was much better 🙂

Ta-Daaaa

Putting the remaining embellishments on the outside frame, I left the foam tape on them and used it to adhere the pieces to the frame.

This project took about three days to do.  It will take quite a bit less time on the next one because I won’t have a slightly panic stricken hole in my brain, nor will I be saying “How am I going to DO this?”

I sure hope Jaime likes this 🙂