Altered Christmas glass ornaments.

Today is the day the video is up on my YouTube channel showing the process of altering these glass ornaments.

Altered glass ornaments

Altered glass ornaments

I used a couple of Sizzix dies – Flourishes and Snowflakes – with my metal duct tape from the hardware store.  The first six I left clear.  The bottom six I used Ranger Industries Alcohol Inks in the colors of Current, Stream, and Butterscotch.

The first three are Current on the left, Stream in the center, and Butterscotch on the right.  The bottom left one is a remix of the colors on the same felt pad and it turned a little brown.  I like that one.  For the final two I used a new felt pad to finish them off.

This flourish was a real bugger to work with.  So many intricate swirls and curves.  This one was way too fiddly for me.  By the time I adhered the second one of this flourish die cut from the metal duct tape….I was so over this whole entire project.  I had to get encouragement from my daughter with the twins to keep going and see it through to the end.

Intricate flourish

Intricate flourish

The Snowflake dies were the easiest to cut out, take apart, and adhere.  I did have a few problems with them but nothing like the really intricate flourish.

Snowflake die

Snowflake die

The less intricate flourish dies were really great to work with.

Less intricate flourish die

Less intricate flourish die

This project took me over two days to complete.  I have the attention span of a gnat and a shorter patience span than that.  Altering Christmas clear glass balls will NOT be on my list of must do decorating again.

My daughter with the twins suggested that I make a whole bunch of these and sell them at a craft fair.  My answer to her was “Not just NO, but H*&L NO!”  I’ll leave that job to someone that enjoys fiddly things.  The other nuisance was having to use the hot glue gun for the ribbon around the neck and the fork bow on each of the balls.

I do get to have the pride and privilege of saying “I made these” and there will never be anymore like them.  Someone else may take a stab at creating these for themselves but they won’t be the same as mine are.

Leslie

Texts from my husband: “Where are U”

I have been putting off a trip to my local big box craft/hobby stores for several months.  My supply of foam mounting squares is getting really low.  So low that a project I’m working on will require more than what I have on hand.

The temptations that await me at a craft/hobby store are more than I have the power to resist.  Even if I take Joe with me as the sane adult.  I have come to flippantly calling my journeys to these stores….seeing my drug dealer.

Just as soon as I walk in the doors I get a rush.  Some endorphin, or whatever the chemical rush is, kicks in and I become hyper focused on the goods displayed.  A joy wells up within me.  An excitement that is akin to a child let loose in a toy store.  The mantra in my head is “I WANT IT!”   The major problem with that is, I can’t seem to muster the restraint required to end up leaving the store with what I had gone in to get in the first place.  Invariably, I wind up leaving the store with a whole lot of stuff and NONE of what I went in for.

I don’t watch the plethora of “HAUL” videos on YouTube because of the same thing.  I see what people have and I feel the great need to say “I WANT IT!”.  This is the main reason why all of the things I create are from my burgeoning stash of old items.  I have way too much stuff from my many previous visits to my “drug dealer”.

So, with Joe in tow, I went to my local Hobby Lobby.  I told him before we got out of the car that I needed to get “Foam Dots”.  My husband is totally awesome in so many ways.  He is, however, an “Enabler”.  He can make the process worse for me.  He’ll see something on display and say “You don’t have this do you?” or “Do you want that?”.  He was going in to find balsa wood strips to prepare for the day he creates a model train landscape with all the bridges and towns.  He has been acquiring bits and pieces since 1993 and has yet to build more than one trestle bridge.

My recent trip to Hobby Lobby

My recent trip to Hobby Lobby

I felt that the best way to handle this was to not stroll next to him.  If I go off on my own, maybe, I can be less tempted and actually get the foam dots.

The foam dots used to be in the back of the store where the Clearance items are located.  Of course, I immediately headed to the clearance area.  First thing that caught my eye was a border punch.

A border punch

A border punch

Who cares that we are nearing winter and the Holiday season.  It is shiny and “I Want It”.

No foam dots in the cart, yet.

The project I am working on needs to have some winter embellishments.  Snowflakes or something winter like.  The butterfly punch, although lovely, is not what I need.  The foam dots were no longer displayed near the Clearance wall.  A small, very small, selection of dies was on display near there.  I saw this die for making snowflakes.  Yes, it is shiny and it went into my cart.

Snowflake die

Snowflake die

I got a text message from Joe.  “Where r u?”

Where r u?

Where r u?

When I left the aisle with the dies I went in search of Joe.  Only to find a couple more things I could not resist.  Clear Christmas balls just waiting to be altered.  Then fake snow to go inside the clear balls.

Clear Christmas balls

Clear Christmas balls

Fake snow

Fake snow

I did, finally, find the foam dots and get them in my shopping cart.

Foam dots

Foam dots

Ultimately, this was the extent of my shopping trip.

Results of my shopping trip

Results of my shopping trip

Well, as  you might imagine…the project I had been diligently working on was put on the back burner.  The whole reason for the trip to the craft/hobby store.  Here is a little teaser for what will be coming to my YouTube channel this coming Tuesday.  It is only a little over one minute long and packed with music, excitement, and a bit like a professional movie trailer 😀

Leslie

Card making supplies at your local hardware store.

Metal duct tape used on cards

Metal duct tape used on cards

In the storage cabinet above my work table is a plethora of adhesives I use.  One of those adhesives is a roll of metal duct tape I’ve had for a number of years.  I used it to make my ink pad, ink refill, and shimmery spritz storage units several years back.

Ink pad and spritz storage from foam core and metal duct tape

Ink pad and spritz storage from foam core and metal duct tape

The metal duct tape comes on a roll about two inches wide and I don’t even know how many yards.  I have used this tape with embossing folders but not with my dies.  I thought I would do some experimenting.

Metal duct tape and dies

Metal duct tape and dies

In my scrap stash I have a lot of three inch square pieces of paper.  So if I screwed up there would be no hardship on me.

An experiment with metal tape and dies

An experiment with metal tape and dies

The die cut snowflakes disappeared in the patterned paper.  I wondered what they would look like on white paper.

Metal tape die cuts on white paper

Metal tape die cuts on white paper

Finding success in using dies with the metal tape I took it one step further and smoothed the tape over a piece of card stock to be used on a card front and ran it through my Big Shot with a snowflake embossing folder from Stampin’ Up!  Some glitter, a bit of Distress Stickles, and a Stampin’ Up! “Let it snow” rubber stamp were the feature items of the card front.

Embossed metal tape

Embossed metal tape

I made two sets of cards.  One dark and one light.  I can’t decided which one I like the best so I sent it out to my Facebook followers to chime in.  The consensus has gone to the darker card.

And here is the card with the snowflake die cuts peeking out from behind the snowman.

Metal tape die cuts on card front

Metal tape die cuts on card front

I used Operation Write Home Card Sketch #16 on this project if you want to know how I made it.  The metal duct tape at the hardware store will make you gulp at the price when you see it.  It is almost $20 for a roll of the metal tape.  Keep in mind that this tape will last for a long time.  It is not used in everyday crafting projects like other adhesives are.

Here is my YouTube video showing the process I used to make these cards with the metal duct tape.

Leslie

Trash to Treasure – Recycling

Okay, that “Treasure” part is a bit of a stretch, but I figured it would be a catchy title.  😀

I have not done a video tutorial on repurposing or recycling a food box that is bound for the trash.  I did take photos of my progress throughout the process and I will share it with you here.

Joe likes the strawberry flavored Pop Tarts.  We purchased a giant sized box of them from our local Sam’s Club.  Inside the box were two more boxes…which I didn’t keep because of the way they opened.  Even with the perforated cut lines the boxes tore all kinds of ways that were not even along the perforations :/

Anyway…..Once I had the box in my craft room I cut the flaps off first thing.

Cut the flaps away to have an open box

Cut the flaps away to have an open box

No fancy tools needed to do this.  Just a pair of scissors will work.

Use scissors or a craft knife

Use scissors or a craft knife

I saved the long flaps to cover the hole in the bottom of the box.

Hole in bottom of box

Hole in bottom of box

Flaps to cover the hole

Flaps to cover the hole

The paper I used is from my stash of design paper.  It measures 11-3/4 x 11-3/4.  I cut the paper at 5-7/8 to get it, roughly, cut in half.  With one sheet of the paper I laid it against one side of the box leaving about 1/2 inch over the top of the box so I could cover the rough edges.  Where the paper rounds the corner I cut a notch out at the fold line for ease of turning the corner and relieving a bulky pinch point.

Place the paper over the front of the box, excess paper folded over and a notch cut out for the corner

Place the paper over the box front, with the top excess fold and cut a notch where it turns the corner

Apply adhesive of your choice to the back of the paper then attach it to the box.

Apply adhesive of your choice and apply to the box

Apply adhesive of your choice and apply to the box

Smooth the paper over the box and press the top edge inward.

Smooth the paper over the box and tuck the top edge inward

Smooth the paper over the box and tuck the top edge inward

Cover the inside of the box to  hide the edges and cover the box flaps that are now the bottom of the box.

Cover the inside of the box to hide the edges

Cover the inside of the box to hide the edges

Decorate the outside of the box to finish it off.

Altered Pop Tart box

Altered Pop Tart box

Coming up in my repertoire of ideas is a trip to the hardware store to purchase a roll of metal duct tape.  I’m going to be using the tape on some dies for a couple of winter themed cards.

Metal duct tape and dies

Metal duct tape and dies

Leslie

References for “Homemade glue dots” and a stolen trick from Tracy

My friend, Lynn, from the UK had asked if I knew of a “caulk” type of product that is used to make glue dots.

The consensus seems to be a product called “Aleene’s Tack it Over and Over”.  It is a repositionable glue with a fairly strong bond.

Aleen’s Tack It Over and Over is available, here in the US, at Michaels, Wal-Mart, Hobby Lobby, and from Amazon.com.

Aleen’s Tack It Over and Over is available in the UK at Amazon.co.uk.

Here are some links to blogs I’ve found that have successfully used this product as glue dots and each blogger has recommendations of his/her own on how best to make these.

  1. The Frugal Crafter
  2. Scraps of Reflection
  3. Splitcoast Stampers Forum

Here is a YouTube video demonstrating how to use Aleen’s Tack It Over and Over


Hope this answers the questions I’ve received.  Now on to my thievery 😀

Tracy, of Tracys Treasurers, had a video a while back showing how to use the metal duct tape (NOT the vinyl duck tape) and embossing folders.

While Joe was in the hospital over the weekend…..

Joe in the hospital

I brought my craft tote up to work on more of the desk organizer boxes.  I was feeling a bit guilty 😦  I don’t know what kind of mother you are, but I have this voice in the back of my  head saying “If you do it for one you have to do something for all”.  I mean, I can’t just show up to Florida with my kids arriving and only have things I’ve made for two of them.  I can’t show favoritism.  Even to my grown up kids.  That just is not right.

While Joe was confined and bored I put him to work on a piece to add to one of the boxes.  My son-in-law (Carissa’s husband) is one creative guy and he is amazing.  I asked Joe for a mechanical drawing that I could add to Jaime’s box.  Joe first rendered the drawing on some scrap notebook paper I had in my tote.  I wadded it up, carefully opened it, then smeared it with Walnut Stain Distress Ink.  Then I glued it to the top of the box.

hand drawn mechanical drawingJoe wanted to make a better drawing when we finally got home.  Which he did.  This drawing is an optical illusion.  Totally cool, huh! 😀

Optical illusion

I wanted gears to be a feature on this box for Jaime but things just kind of went pair shaped.

Cuttlebug embossing folder and metal duct tape

I like how it has turned out.  Getting home and ramming around through my ancient stash pieces I finally found the things that would make this piece pull together.

Organizer box for Jaime

Then, of course, after having made the organizer box for Loreli I felt it was necessary to make one for her husband, Chad.  He is a golfer, and was once a golf instructor in Florida.  While I fussed around with Jaime’s box and got stranded I went to work on Chad’s until I had a breakthrough with Jaime’s.  Chad’s was finished first in the hospital.

Golf themed organizer box

I have one more box to complete yet tonight before we get back to our day jobs.  If I have time tomorrow morning I’ll show you the last box.  Then all my children that will be with us in Florida will all have something handmade by me 😀

Gotta get running, my time is really running out.  Have a fantastic week everyone.  I will now that Joe is out of danger and ready to resume our lives 😀

Leslie

Ink Pad storage from Foam Core Board – Part 2

Ink pad storage from Foam Core Board

Ink pad storage from Foam Core Board

 

My critical eye sees this completed storage piece as crooked, some of the slots are more narrow than others, and I see all the flaws.  The next one I make for my home made spritzes will be made a little differently and I have found the math I used on the ink pad storage was a little bit off.

If you make one of these, add 3/16″ on both sides of  the top and bottom widths of your pieces.  That will ensure your outer pieces match up for clean corners.  As you see in the photo above the top piece doesn’t go all the way out to cover the side pieces.

Also, when I finished this thing and slid it under the radio/cd thing – it didn’t fit.  I had to take the bottom piece off in order to get it underneath.

Am I ready to tear this thing apart and start over?  No.  It serves a function and it is just fine the way that it is.

Okay.  Now to finish where I started yesterday.

I measured for the divider supports at 4-1/4″ and 8-1/2″, drew lines from top to bottom along the 18″ length and used the metal duct tape to adhere the support.

Attached support

Attached support

I peeled back only half of the adhesive cover on the metal tape and attached that to the back side of the support.  The second piece of metal tape will have only half of the adhesive cover peeled away.

Attach the metal tape only half way along the length

Attach the metal tape only half way along the length

Peel back only half of the protective covering

Peel back only half of the protective covering

The adhesive on this metal tape is SUPER STICKY and the metal is SHARP.  I cut one of my knuckles during this process.

Attach the exposed half of the tape to the length of your support and press it down with  your fingers.  Use a bone folder to press out as many of the kinks as you can.  The bone folder will ensure the metal tape is fully adhered to the surface.

Attach the metal tape to the back of your support

Attach the metal tape to the back of your support

Use a bone folder to fully adhere the metal tape to the support

Use a bone folder to fully adhere the metal tape to the support

Open the two pieces of metal tape.  Fold them back like wings.  LEAVE THE PROTECTIVE PAPER ON THE TAPE.

Line up your support with the pencil mark guide on the back piece.  When you  have the support properly lined up on your guide line then peel off the protective cover on the metal tape and press it down to the back piece.  Use a bone folder to press the tape more fully to the back.

Peel the protective cover off the tape after you have lined up the piece on your guide line

Peel the protective cover off the tape after you have lined up the piece on your guide line

Press the tape to the back piece

Press the tape to the back piece

Use the bone folder to fully adhere the metal tape to the back

Use the bone folder to fully adhere the metal tape to the back

Now do the same thing to the other side of the support piece.

Do the same to the inside piece of the support

Do the same to the inside piece of the support

My shelves measure 5″ deep, 12-1/2″ wide.  I’ve made the cut outs at 4-1/4″ and 8-1/2″.  Using the Big Bite Cropadile to punch the hole at the top end of the cut out.

Punch holes to make the end of the cut out easier to deal with

Punch holes to make the end of the cut out easier to deal with

Cut out the slat spaces

Cut out the slat spaces

Insert your shelf in the support and press down until it seats itself.

Slide your shelf in the slats

Slide your shelf in the slats

Press down until the shelf meets the back

Press down until the shelf meets the back

Make the rest of your shelves and insert them in the support slat areas.

Add your shelves to the supports

Add your shelves to the supports

Test fit your ink pads to make sure they fit well.  Now is the time to make any adjustments before you enclose this box with the sides and top.

I have some smaller sized ink pads that will get lost under the shelves.  I cut several down to a 4-1/2″ width to compensate for the shorter pads.  Then I even cut some shelves further to 3″ for the Tim Holtz Distress Ink pads.

Shorter ink pads I made adjustment to shelf size for

Shorter ink pads I made adjustments to shelf size for

Adjust your shelf width to fit your ink pads

Adjust your shelf width to fit our ink pads

Once  you have all your shelving in place and you have test fitted all of the ink pads, it is time to close it all in by adding the sides, top, and bottom pieces.  I used the metal tape to do this.

Same as with the supports.  Only peel back half of the protective paper on the tape and adhere to the back side of the unit.  Press the tape down then burnish with the bone folder.  Then peel the protective paper all the way off and press one of the outer pieces – top or side piece – onto to the tape.  Make sure your edges line up before you fully press the tape into place and burnish down.

Adhering the top piece.  Peel back only half of the protective paper.

Adhering the top piece. Peel back only half of the protective paper.

Press the tape fully using the bone folder

Press the tape fully using the bone folder

Peel the protective paper off fully

Peel the protective paper off fully

Attach your outer piece - top, bottom, or sides - and press with the bone folder

Attach your outer piece - top, bottom, or sides - and press with the bone folder

Once you have added all of the outer pieces then add the metal tape to the corners for additional support.

Attach the metal tape to the corners for additional support

Attach the metal tape to the corners for additional support

Fill your new storage system with your ink pads.  Looks like I need to write on the outside of the ink pad what color it is.  At least for the non Stampin’ Up! pads.

Add your ink pads to your new storage system and give yourself a pat on the back

Add your ink pads to your new storage system and give yourself a pat on the back

I will have a video uploaded later today on how to make this.  This is easy to make, takes a bit of time but the results are worth it.  Even if it is a bit wonky.