Ink refill storage from Foam Core

Next bit of construction is for the ink refills

Next bit of construction is for the ink refills

That sad little jumbled mess of ink refill bottles need to have a permanent home.  Especially since my other ink products have homes.

I thought about this project for quite some time.  How in the world am I supposed to get a bunch of little squares?!  How big of a storage system will I need?!

First thing I measured the width of all of the ink refill bottles.  One of the Stampin’ Up!, one of the Tim Holtz Distress Inks, one from VersaMark.  Each of them were the same diameter.  About 1-1/8″ across.  I have a total of about 46 bottles.  From one left over piece of Foam Core board that measured 9″ x 15″ I decided the best thing to do would be to make 1-1/4″ sections with 1/4″ between each row and column.  This is what I came up with.

Testing my skills as well as the width and height of the scrap Foam Core

Testing my skills as well as the width and height of the scrap Foam Core

After I had all the little squares made it was time to see if the bottles would fit within the confines of the pencil lines.  Test it first before I begin building it.

Each bottle has enough wiggle room

Each bottle has enough wiggle room

Next was to get eight (8) supports created.  I made them 2-1/4″ wide by 9″ long.  I did the same with them as I did with the supports for the Shimmer Spritz.  I measured down 3/8″ from the top on one side.

I think I may have written 3/16″ yesterday.  Please forgive me.  The correct measurement is 3/8″.  Joe came home this afternoon and I had to show off my creations.  He is the one that found my measurement wrong.

3/8" down from top

3/8" down from top

Getting my eight (8) supports cut I was now ready to make the 3/8″ mark from the top of each and draw a 1″ line down (or across – whichever way you say it) all of the supports.

8 supports cut at 2-1/4" x 9"

8 supports cut at 2-1/4" x 9"

Measure in 1" on one side

Measure in 1" on one side

Sorry for the out of focus shot here.  I measured down from the 3/8″ 1-1/4″ made a mark then another mark at 1/4″ then down once again at 1-1/4″ and another 1/4″.  I did that down as far as I could go.

Next was to go to the outer edge and begin the 1-1/4″ mark, 1/4″ mark, and 1-1/4″ mark along the outer edge.  Then connect the  marks.  This made my angle to hold those little refill bottles in and keep them from deciding to have a “Walk About” with the least jiggle of the table.

Marking the cut away for the angled support

Marking the cut away for the angled support

Cutting out the inside edge I chose to forgo the Big Bite Cropadile step and just cut the section out with the craft knife.  Not too hard to do.  Having to do eight (8) of these instead of just two it went quicker than I expected.

Cutting out the notches

Cutting out the notches

Since I was in the measuring and cutting business right then I figured I may as well get the shelves out of the way as well.  Each shelf measures 2-1/4″ x 13″.  The same process of 1-1/4″ mark, 1/4″ mark, 1-1/4″ mark and so on.  I did this to five (5) shelves.

Measured and marked each shelf

Measured and marked each shelf

The support and the shelf now look like this.

Support and shelf cut out

Support and shelf cut out

I got so busy with the metal tape on each of the shelves I forgot to take pictures.  That is a whole lot of metal tape – Yikes!  I even found I had put one of the supports on upside down and had to cut the tape and do it all over again to fix it.

Tape up all the supports.  Getting each support lined up in the 1/4″ mark on the base (or back) as I had penciled it all out at first.  Then putting the shelves on.  Fitting the shelves onto all  those supports with the cut outs was a bit of a trial but it was accomplished.

Then I measured and cut the two sides, top, and bottom.  Taped them all on and then added the metal tape to the four corners for stability.  This is how the little storage thing came out 😀

Ink refill storage

Ink refill storage

Now all of my ink products are in one area.  A place that took up quite a large amount of space on my table top, hanging from baskets where my punches now reside, and lots of room in the cupboard above my head.

The deepest storage piece is 5″.  I have my work surface free to work without getting stuff jammed under wooden trays, metal bins, and all kinds of other stuff.

Foam core storage systems

Foam core storage systems

I had to do a little bit of “plastic surgery” on my Shimmer Spritz storage.  The girl had sagging around her corners and needed to be tucked up a bit.

A few scrap pieces of Foam Core, a bit of hot glue, strategic placement of the support piece and good as new 😀

Cut scraps into 3/8" widths

Cut scraps into 3/8" widths

Get a corner emptied

Get a corner emptied

Test fit the strip

Test fit the strip

Mark and cut off excess

Mark and cut off excess

Apply hot glue

Apply hot glue

Put the support in place and hold until the hot glue has time to set

Put the support in place and hold until the hot glue has time to set

Repeat steps until all the shelves are supported on their outer edges

Repeat steps until all the shelves are supported on their outer edges

Total time about 30 minutes to prop up the sagging corners

Total time about 30 minutes to prop up the sagging corners

There you have it.  Three storage units in just as many days.  Total cost about $15 for the Foam Core.  It would be considerably less if I would have been able to find the 36″ x 42″ Foam Core instead of the 16″ x 20″.  The bonus is that I made them myself.

Me!  With no construction background, appallingly bad math skills, no idea how to calculate for an angle, plus wonky and uneven cuts with the craft knife.  I did it!!!

Custom made storage solutions, such as these, would cost well over $100 and I have mine for $15.

Next, in a few days when I don’t have to run Joe around half the country side.  I’m thinking about using the Foam Core scraps to make one of those Tim Holtz box things.  The box within a box.  Whatever they are called.  The “Configuration” Box.  Sells for $15.95 US and I think I can make one for FREE with my scrap Foam Core pieces.  At least I’m going to give it a try 😀

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4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. gardenpinks
    Apr 07, 2012 @ 14:43:27

    What a difference your ink storage makes to your desk area – all neat and tidy but all to hand and because you went ‘up’ the storage has a small foot print on your desk. Love it 🙂 Well done Leslie.
    Good luck with the configuration box, Rod made me a similar thing last year out of scraps of wood and there are wonky bits but with it painted and covered with tissue paper and stamping it isn’t so obviously wonky 🙂 Really enjoyed doing it too.

    Happy Easter weekend to you and Joe.

    Love and hugs
    Lynn xx

    Reply

    • Message In A Fold
      Apr 07, 2012 @ 15:23:46

      Man I know, such a difference those storage things make. I’m so glad I made them to fit my needs.

      I remember your “Configuration” box made by Rod 😀 Turned out beautiful. I just hope that I can figure it out and make one before I have to go back out on the road…..seems that it is going to be sooner than I figured. Oh well, it is that time once again.

      Happy Easter to your and your family as well. I keep forgetting about it. We no longer have little ones, or young children around any longer so it is just another Sunday to me. Enjoy your day with your family.

      Love you – Leslie

      Reply

  2. Kate Soons
    Oct 22, 2014 @ 06:42:16

    Thank you so much for sharing your information abou the ink pad/re-inker foam storage. I am sooo excited to do this! I really like your writing style and how you shared your experience. Paper crafters are kindred spirits, for sure. Thanks again for all your efforts! Rubber hugs!

    Reply

    • Message In A Fold
      Oct 22, 2014 @ 08:18:13

      Thank you, Kate Soons, for your very kind comment on my ink pad/re-inker foam core storage build on my blog. I appreciate you stopping by and spending time with me :D. Just “Keepin’ It Real” is what I’m about 😀 Warts and all.
      Leslie

      Reply

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